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For some reason, this always returns value 1. The point of this is to find the starting number (1-1,000,000) that loops the most amount of times (until j = 1). j will always end up being 1 eventually (collatz theory), I divide j by 2 if it's even, or multiple by 3 and add 1 if it's odd.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int collatz() {
int counter = 0;
int holder = 0;

for (int i = 999999; i > 1; i--){           // loops 999,999 times
    for (int j = i; j != 1; counter++) {    // loops until j = 1, records amount of loops
        if (j % 2 == 0) {                   // if j is even, divide by 2, +1 to counter
            j = j / 2;
        } else {
            j = (j*3) + 1;                  // if j is odd, multiply by 3 and add 1, +1 to counter
        }
    }
    if (holder < counter){          // records highest number of loops
    holder = counter;
    counter = 0;
    } else {
    counter = 0;
    }


}
    return holder;
}

int main()
{
    cout << collatz << endl;
    return 0;
}
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1  
If my memory serves correctly, you might need to use long long even in that range, as the temporary variable j can grow a lot and therefore overflow before it's reduced to 1. –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 21 '13 at 10:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're not calling your function, you're printing out the function pointer (which is converted to the bool value true (i.e. 1)).

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Ah thanks, but now it doesn't work at all when I call it. Is it because it's too much to process? –  Foxic Mar 21 '13 at 10:24
1  
this is a good interview puzzle. I notice the odd thing in mainafter staring at the function for 2 minutes. –  UmNyobe Mar 21 '13 at 10:25
    
@Foxic What do you mean by "doesn't work"? Does it take a long time? Forever? It just exits? It prints the wrong value? –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 21 '13 at 10:28
    
It just opens the command prompt window, and it's completely blank except for the underscore blinking at the start. –  Foxic Mar 21 '13 at 10:29
    
@Foxic Then I suggest you start looking into the ending condition of your inner loop. Are you sure that j will be 1 sometime? Or it might be that it just take a very long time. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 21 '13 at 10:31

First, use unsigned int or unsigned long long as the variable type of j to increase the arithmetic range.

Then, in the loop, check for overflow.

 while (j!=1) {
    counter++;
    if (j % 2 == 0) {
        j >>= 1;
    } else {
        unsigned int j2 = j;
        j = (j*3) + 1;
        if (j2 > j) {
           return -1;  // or surround this with try/catch/throw exception
        }
   }
 }

With int i; the counter will overflow at i==113383;
and with unsigned int i; at 159487. If these are not checked, there's a possibility of infinite loop.

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Edit: nvm, I see your point –  Foxic Mar 21 '13 at 10:40
    
And lastly, call the function... –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 21 '13 at 10:46

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