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I have few question while implementing the subversion for my project using svnkit library.

1) I checkout a file from repository and made changes locally, before i commit other user checkout the same file and made changes and committed the file. But if i commit now it will throw an error.

So it is possible to update the latest svn changes in my local checkout file without overridden my local changes. i.e. something like update to head we do in eclipse.

[or]

2) It is possible to check whether conflict will occur or not before committing a file. because once conflict occurs it automatically creates duplicate version of the file with local and repository changes.How to avoid this case

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So it is possible to update the latest svn changes in my local checkout file without overridden my local changes. i.e. something like update to head we do in eclipse.

This is just what svn update does. In case there is a conflict (you and the other edited the same part of the file), you will end up with three files in you working copy:

file
file.mine
file.rXXX

file.mine will contain your own modifications, file.rXXX the other's modifications, and file will be an attempt at merging the file, which you should edit before marking the conflict as resolved and committing.

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I need to use the file which contains both repository and local changes after editing and marking the conflict as resolved and then commit. – Java Learner Mar 26 '13 at 4:06
    
It is possible to check the local version and repository version for version comparison before committing. so that will intimate the user to do force commit or not. – Java Learner Mar 26 '13 at 4:08
    
After conflict occurs how to resolve the conflicts and commit the file. – Java Learner Mar 26 '13 at 5:46

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