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I am developing an application in which i am writing and reading on a socket. However, it is only doing the task 11 times, then it sleeps.

PollThread.java

public class PollThread {

    static String result;
    private static Timer myTimer;
    static String ip = "192.168.1.19";

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        System.out.println("PollThread");
        myTimer = new Timer();
        myTimer.schedule(new TimerTask() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                ClientThread cThread = new ClientThread(ip);
                String status = cThread.readStatus();
                System.out.println("Staus :: "+status);
            }
        }, 0, 2000);

    }
}

ClientThread.java

public class ClientThread {

    String byte_to_hex, swapped_result, result,ipAddr;
    public Socket s;
    public InputStream i;
    public OutputStream o;
    int status;

    public ClientThread(String ip) {
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
        this.ipAddr=ip;

    }

    public int readStatus() {
        try {
            s = new Socket(ipAddr, 502);
            i = s.getInputStream();
            o = s.getOutputStream();

            byte[] data1 = new byte[1024], packet1 = { (byte) 0x00,
                    (byte) 0x00, (byte) 0x00, (byte) 0x00, (byte) 0x00,
                    (byte) 0x06, (byte) 0x01, (byte) 0x01, (byte) 0x00,
                    (byte) 0x00, (byte) 0x00, (byte) 0x19 };

            o.write(packet1);
            i.read(data1, 0, 1024);//Comment this
            byte_to_hex = bytesToHex(data1).substring(18, 26);

            char[] arr = byte_to_hex.toCharArray();
            for (int i = 0; i < arr.length - 1; i += 2) {
                char temp = arr[i];
                arr[i] = arr[i + 1];
                arr[i + 1] = temp;
            }

            swapped_result = new String(arr);

            result = hexStringToNBitBinary(swapped_result, 32);

            int counter = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < result.length(); i++) {
                if (result.charAt(i) == '1') {
                    counter++;
                }
            }
            status = counter;

        } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return status;
    }
}

Result

Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1
Staus :: 1

if I comment out i.read(data1, 0, 1024); then it works fine, but I need this line to get the result.

What could be the problem with this? Why it is only running 11 times?

UPDATE-1

Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...
Status :: 1
Reading status...

Update 2

I have also tried by adding this line cThread.start();in PollThread.java file but yet result is same.

share|improve this question
2  
Why is ClientThread extending Thread? – Sudhanshu Mar 21 '13 at 10:32
    
@Sudhanshu because i want to this task in separate thread, in fact if i don't extend thread then also it gives me same result. – juned Mar 21 '13 at 10:33
2  
..and why are you using a timer to continually create threads? Why can you not just create one poll thread that loops? – Martin James Mar 21 '13 at 10:33
3  
@juned - you may be extending thread, but you never start it, so your class is running synchronously. – Perception Mar 21 '13 at 10:35
1  
As other commenters have mentioned, your Timer is actually creating multiple client connections, one every two seconds, as opposed to a single connection that tests periodically. It's quite possible that your "server simulator" has a max connect count of 10 or 11... – SeKa Mar 21 '13 at 11:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As other commenters have mentioned, your Timer is actually creating multiple client connections, one every two seconds, as opposed to a single connection that tests periodically. It's quite possible that your "server simulator" has a max connect count of 10 or 11. Try moving your client connection outside your TimerTask, so it's not created each time:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    System.out.println("PollThread");
    myTimer = new Timer();
    final ClientThread cThread = new ClientThread(ip);
    myTimer.schedule(new TimerTask() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            String status = cThread.readStatus();
            System.out.println("Staus :: "+status);
        }
    }, 0, 2000);
}

Sorry just noticed that you're creating a new Socket inside the readStatus method, which is essentially the same multiple connection problem. Try moving that stuff into the Constructor, like:

public ClientThread(String ip) {
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    this.ipAddr=ip;

    try {
        s = new Socket(ipAddr, 502);
        i = s.getInputStream();
        o = s.getOutputStream();
    // ...
}

public int readStatus() {
    try {
        //s = new Socket(ipAddr, 502);
        //i = s.getInputStream();
        //o = s.getOutputStream();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but again same result :( . is there any other way to achieve this ? – juned Mar 21 '13 at 11:16
    
@juned Sorry noticed your readStatus method was re-creating Socket each time. See edit above that'll move that work to the Constructor. – SeKa Mar 21 '13 at 11:20
    
yeah its working now, you are Awesome Thanks a lot, now just one question is this code is okay or not as we consider a performance, if is there any suggestion please let me know. thanks again – juned Mar 21 '13 at 11:22
    
@juned It's difficult to answer a performance question w/o knowing your requirements, but overall Java's Timer does a pretty good job of managing resources. My only other suggestion from a Java-coding-style perspective would be to move the Timer stuff you have out of main and into a method specifically named for that purpose. This makes your code more portable, if you wanted to have main handle something else, for example. – SeKa Mar 21 '13 at 11:34
    
@Thanks again, i have 7 this kind of room so i just move all common code in single class so now i think this solution will help me to improve the performance of my application. – juned Mar 21 '13 at 11:47

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