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Very simple question, not sure if there are any differences in these ways of creating a javascript "module". I'm hoping somebody can clarify it for me.

A)

var foo = function() {
    var bar = function() {
        console.log('test');
    };

    return {
        bar: bar
    };
};

B)

var foo = function() {
    function bar() {
        console.log('test');
    };

    return {
        bar: bar
    };
};

C)

var foo = function() {
    this.bar = function() {
        console.log('test');
    };

    return {    
        bar: this.bar
    };
};
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Apart the fact the last wouldn't compile, there is no difference. –  dystroy Mar 21 '13 at 11:04
1  
The last one is bad (there's no self in JavaScript) but the other two are exactly the same. –  Tom van der Woerdt Mar 21 '13 at 11:05
    
damn it... updating the question :D –  mat-mcloughlin Mar 21 '13 at 11:07
    
The new last one still doesn't work. It would add a function to any receiver (for example window) if you call it as foo(); –  dystroy Mar 21 '13 at 11:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A and B are essentially the same, though there is a very minor difference between A and B due to function/variable hoisting, theoretically you could write code which would work in B but break in A, but practically speaking you'd have to really write weird code to do so.

C will work, but is conceptually wrong. The point of using this.funcName in a function is as a constructor (creating lots of objects using new Thing(). If you aren't using the function as a constructor you shouldn't be using that style as someone scanning the code may mistake the function as a constructor instead of its actual purpose which is a module.

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At first, you forgot to execute the function expression: the module pattern is an IEFE. You just create a function.

Your last example is nonsense, it looks like a constructor function when assigning properties to this - and when executed as a IEFE it breaks (and using it with new has undesired effects; an when returning an object it's useless).

For the difference between the first and the second snippet see JavaScript: var functionName = function() {} vs function functionName() {}. In context of the module pattern, the function declaration is recommended.

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prefix var before a function makes it a "class"-ish, this means you can make many versions of it. This goes for A

For example:

  var hi = function()
  {
    var bye = function()
    {
        alert("bye");
    }   
    bye(); // this will call bye
    var something = new bye(); // this will create a new instance of bye();
  }

  var something = new hi();
  something();

B means you can only call bar, not make a new instance of it inside the function.

C is the same as bar because of its scope

Class-ish:

var Dog = function( hair, type )
{
     this.hair = hair;
     this.type = type;
}

var fred = new Dog( "long", "Dalmation" );
alert( fred.hair );    

var dave = new Dog( "short", "Poodle" );
alert( dave.type);

This is a class ^

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Prefixing var does not in the slightest make it a class. –  mattmanser Mar 21 '13 at 11:25
    
@mattmanser Read edit above... It's a great class :) –  Jimmyt1988 Mar 21 '13 at 11:28
    
The var is irrelevant, all it will do is change when your function gets declared due to function and variable hoisting. var Dog = function() {} is just a different (and imo bad) way of writing function Dog() {} –  mattmanser Mar 21 '13 at 11:39
    
@mattmanser If you do not declare Dog as a variable... you cannot make new instances of it... It is well documented across the internet. Be careful with that stuff hehe, it can be confusing I know! Try it in your editor, you'll see you cannot make instances of it. It'll only work for one :) I use it for all the games I write, creating arrays of my classes etc :D –  Jimmyt1988 Mar 21 '13 at 11:44
    
Honestly, it's not: jsfiddle.net/Wvt8C/1 Your way is definitely the unconventional way. Go look on MDN or at almost any tutorial. I've seen your style in at most a couple of articles. –  mattmanser Mar 21 '13 at 14:24

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