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suppose I have two matrix as mentioned below:

A =  17    33    49    65    81    97   113   129   145   161   177

B =  31    57    83   109   135

I want to put them in a cell like this:

[31, 17]      [57, 17]       [83, 17]      [109, 17]     [135, 17]
[31, 33]      [57, 33]       [83, 33]      [109, 33]     [135, 33]
[31, 49]      [57, 49]       [83, 49]      [109, 49]     [135, 49]
[31, 65]      [57, 65]       [83, 65]      [109, 65]     [135, 65]
[31, 81]      [57, 81]       [83, 81]      [109, 81]     [135, 81]
[31, 97]      [57, 97]       [83, 97]      [109, 97]     [135, 97]
[31, 113]     [57, 113]      [83, 113]     [109, 113]    [135, 113]
[31, 129]     [57, 129]      [83, 129]     [109, 129]    [135, 129]
[31, 145]     [57, 145]      [83, 145]     [109, 145]    [135, 145]
[31, 161]     [57, 161]      [83, 161]     [109, 161]    [135, 161]
[31, 177]     [57, 177]      [83, 177]     [109, 177]    [135, 177]

How can I do that in Matlab with C code?

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So MATLAB or C code? –  Eitan T Mar 21 '13 at 11:20
    
Using c code in matlab –  Mohammad Kh Mar 21 '13 at 11:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Native MATLAB solution

meshgrid is sometimes useful to generate a list of all possible pairs of values from different sets:

[X, Y] = meshgrid(B, A);
C = reshape(arrayfun(@horzcat, X(:), Y(:), 'Uniform', 0), numel(A), numel(B));

C holds the result you're looking for.

Example

Let's do an example for the following A and B:

A = [10 20 30 40];
B = [1 2 3];

The purpose of meshgrid is to create a matrix which duplicates the vectors along dimensions. So vector B is duplicated along the first dimension, and A is duplicated along the second dimension. The result of [X, Y] = meshgrid(B, A) is:

X =
    10    20    30    40
    10    20    30    40
    10    20    30    40


Y =
     1     1     1     1
     2     2     2     2
     3     3     3     3

Both vectors are duplicated to produce matrices of equal dimensions.

Regarding X(:), it means that X is converted into a column vector, concatenating column-by-column. So X(:) results in [10; 10; 10; 20; 20; 20; 30; 30; 30; ...]. The same applies to Y(:).

Now the tricky part: arrayfun applies a function (in this case horzcat, which simply means horizontal concatenation) individually to each element in the input vector. In our case there are two input vectors, X(:) and Y(:), so arrayfun applies horzcat on each corresponding pair of elements, eventually producing all possible combinations of X and Y.
Also, since each concatenation results is a vector (containing two values), the output of arrayfun must be a cell-array, and so a flag called 'UniformOutput' must be set to false.
I suggest that you read more about arrayfun in the official documentation to understand it better.

The last part is reshape, which adjusts the dimensions of the output cell array to match those in your example (number of rows matches the length of A, and number of columns matches the length of B).

Hope that this clears up this solution a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
Eitan T, I'm new in MATLAB. Would you please explain how does your code work? –  Mohammad Kh Mar 21 '13 at 16:59
    
@MohammadKh I've added an explanation. –  Eitan T Mar 21 '13 at 20:00
1  
Eitan T, Thank you. –  Mohammad Kh Mar 21 '13 at 20:16
output = zeros(length(A)*length(B),2);
for i=1:length(B)
  for j=1:length(A)
     output(length(A)*(i-1)+j,:) = [B(i) A(j)];
  end
end
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