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I'm reading a rectangle's position and rotation from an SVG file which has a matrix in the following format:

<rect transform="matrix(1.02414 -0.133308 0.122628 0.942091 190.767 780.999)" width="122" height="20"/>

Now I'm trying to parse these values into Lua to draw with Corona and physics like this, but they partially come up false, and in my current half-guessing approach also often NAN. What would I need to do to convert above matrix into the proper Lua rotation in degrees?

What I have so far is below (the values array are the matrix values in the order of the SVG). Thanks!

local x = values[5]; local y = values[6]
local rotation = math.acos(values[1])
if values[2] < 0 then rotation = -rotation end
rotation = math.floor( math.deg(rotation) )
rotation = rotation % 360

app.spritesHandler:createBar( math.floor(x), math.floor(y), rotation )

enter image description here

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That is not usual rotation matrix as it contains numbers above 1. So, arccos fails. –  Egor Skriptunoff Mar 21 '13 at 11:47
    
Thanks, do you know what to do? –  Philipp Lenssen Mar 21 '13 at 11:52
    
It's worth noting that even if it's a matrix of say "0.995136 0.276294 -0.254158 0.91541" the cofe fails to properly convert to degrees. –  Philipp Lenssen Mar 21 '13 at 11:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems to be stretching combined with rotation, as v[4]/v[1] == -v[3]/v[2].
So, rotation could be calculated in this way:

local str = '<rect transform="matrix(1.02414 -0.133308 0.122628 0.942091 190.767 780.999)" width="122" height="20"/>'
local v = {}
str:match'matrix(%b())':gsub('[%d.-]+', function(d) v[#v+1] = tonumber(d) end)
local x, y = unpack(v, 5)
local rotation = math.floor(math.deg(math.atan2(v[3], v[4]))) % 360
share|improve this answer
    
It works perfectly! Brilliant! I added another "rotation = 360 - rotation" afterwards as final step to get it work, perhaps something to do with the rest of my code or Corona drawing. Thanks so much this is incredibly helpful to the game I'm making! –  Philipp Lenssen Mar 21 '13 at 12:47
    
@PhilippLenssen - Just replace math.atan2(v[3], v[4]) with math.atan2(v[2], v[1]) to get the opposite rotation. –  Egor Skriptunoff Mar 21 '13 at 12:51

Firstly, I think you need to index from 0 to 5, not from 1 to 6.

According to the spec, the rotation matrix is:

a  c  e
b  d  f
0  0  1

where a-f are the 6 numbers in the matrix list.

We also discover that a rotate(angle,cx,cy) around cx,cy is equivalent to

  1. Translate(cx,cy)
  2. Rotate(angle)
  3. Translate(-cx,-cy)

Which would be:

|1 0 cx|  |cos(t) -sin(t) 0|  |1 0 -cx|
|0 1 cy|  |sin(t)  cos(t) 0|  |0 1 -cy|
|0 0 1 |  |  0       0    1|  |0 0  1 |

  |cos(t)   -sin(t)  cx|  |1 0 -cx|
= |sin(t)    cos(t)  cy|  |0 1 -cy|
  |   0        0      1|  |0 0  1 |

  |cos(t)   -sin(t)  (-cx cos(t) + cy sin(t) + cx) |
= |sin(t)    cos(t)  (-cx sin(t) - cy cos(t) + cy) |
  |  0         0              1                    |

So this shows that the angle information is available entirely independently in coefficients a, b, c and d. If the only thing applied is this matrix, then a and d should match, and b and c should just be opposite sign.

However, looking at your list of numbers, they are not, so I wonder if some other transformation has been applied as well? As commenters point out, the numbers are above 1 and therefore not the result of a simple trig operation on an angle.

One possibility is that there has also been a scaling. That matrix is:

| sx 0  0|
|  0 sy 0| 
|  0  0 1|

So if that was applied first, and then the rotation, we would get:

| sx 0  0| |cos(t)   -sin(t)  (-cx cos(t) + cy sin(t) + cx) |
|  0 sy 0| |sin(t)    cos(t)  (-cx sin(t) - cy cos(t) + cy) |
|  0  0 1| |  0         0              1                    |

  |sx cos(t)   -sx sin(t)   sx (-cx cos(t) + cy sin(t) + cx) |
= |sy sin(t)    sy cos(t)   sy (-cx sin(t) - cy cos(t) + cy) |
  |  0               0                  1                    |

From that matrix:

a/c = sx cos(t) / (-sx sin(t))
    = - cos(t) / sin(t)
    = 1/tan(t)
tan(t) = c/a

tan(t) = 0.122628/1.02414
       = 0.119738
    t  = 6.82794 degrees.

I think that looks about right, from the image.

So since we know t, we can work out sx and sy:

a = sx cos(t) 
sx = a/cos(t) = 1.0315

And sy:

d = sy cos(t)
sy = d/cos(t) = 0.94882

Getting cx and cy to find the centre of rotation is then just further substitution into the equations for e and f above, using the values we have already obtained.

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Thanks so much, this looks extensive! (Lua arrays are 1-based by the way, hence the 1 to 6.) I don't quite know where to start now with the Lua code. Would you have pseudo code in any language to explain perhaps? –  Philipp Lenssen Mar 21 '13 at 12:27
    
Those calculations for t, sx, and sy are pseudo code. Instead of a,b,c,d,e,f, you want values[1]..values[6], and you need to rearrange the e and f terms to get cx and cy. What more are you looking for? I assume you can perform translation and scaling as well as rotation. For example for e you have sx (-cx cos(t) + cy sin(t) + cx), and you already have sx and t, leaving you with a pair of simultaneous equations for cx and cy from e and f. –  Phil H Mar 21 '13 at 12:29

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