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In the following C++ functions:

void MyFunction(int age, House &purchased_house)
{
    ...
}


void MyFunction(const int age, House &purchased_house)
{
    ...
}

Which is better?

In both, 'age' is passed by value. I am wondering if the 'const' keyword is necessary: It seems redundant to me, but also helpful (as an extra indication the variable will not be changing).

Does anyone have any opinion as to which (if any) of the above are better?

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3  
A similar question was in this StackOverflow post: stackoverflow.com/questions/117293/… –  Void Oct 12 '09 at 23:39

12 Answers 12

up vote 18 down vote accepted

This, IMHO, is overusing. When you say 'const int age,...' what you actually say is "you can't change even the local copy inside your function". What you do is actually make the programmer code less readable by forcing him to use another local copy when he wants to change age/pass it by non-const reference.

Any programmer should be familiar with the difference between pass by reference and pass by value just as any programmer should understand 'const'.

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33  
Forcing the programmer to use another local variable name instead of reusing the formal input parameter is a good thing. Reusing the parameter for a new purpose by assigning a new value to it makes the code less readable by giving that name multiple purposes. Some languages don't allow this, example C#. –  Brian Ensink Oct 12 '09 at 14:18
14  
-1. Using const actually helps debugging here. By forcing the programmer to use a LOCAL variable, it helps her (and her readers) to actually understand that the changes are not going to be propagated outside of the method / function. –  Matthieu M. Oct 12 '09 at 14:26
6  
It all boils down to the question "what does the READERs' level in programming and what are they used to?" For a beginner, exceptions, reference semantics and even implicit cast may seem unclear and unreadable. When I write code I try to be clear. I don't, however, aim to be understood by every beginner. It is more important for me to avoid the pattern matching (mentioned by litb and idimba in their answers) the experienced programmer may wrongfully do (much like I will probably do). and I expect the reader to understand pass by copy. –  Oren S Oct 12 '09 at 15:26
4  
To be honest, i don't understand how this is at this low point currently either. He's made a good point that it's just saying something about local things having no effect to the caller. His point of view on the force-creation-of-new-local may be a bit offtopic (btw, cpp-next.com/archive/2009/08/want-speed-pass-by-value encourages you to modify the parameter directly), but i don't think it deserves a -5. As others already pointed out, whether const or not, it won't propagate changes to arguments that were passed by value, so the "-1" comment above isn't quite correct either. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 12 '09 at 16:45
8  
Wow, the number of downvotes on this answer is staggering. To those who downvoted: there is no advantage to taking an argument by const value, and actually, taking a parameter by value can stop a spurious copy over taking a parameter by const reference and later copying it, if the argument is a temporary. Matthieu M and Partial's comments seem amateurish. Those of us who are experienced would notice if a parameter is by copy or by reference, and I for one am not writing worse code just so newbies can read it. –  rlbond Nov 12 '09 at 2:15

First, it's just an implementation detail, and if you put const there, don't put it in the declaration set (header). Only put it in the implementation file:

// header
void MyFunction(int age, House &purchased_house);

// .cpp file
void MyFunction(const int age, House &purchased_house);
{
    ...
}

Whether or not a parameter is const in a definition is purely an implementation detail, and should not be part of the interface.

I've not seen this sort of thing often, and i also don't do this. Having the parameter const would confuse me more often than help, because i would immediately pattern-match-fail it to "const int &age" :) The matter of course is entirely different from having const at another level:

// const is a *good* thing here, and should not be removed,
// and it is part of the interface
void MyFunction(const string &name, House &purchased_house);
{
    ...
}

In this case, the const will affect whether the function can change the caller's argument. Const in this meaning should be used as often as possible, because it can help ensuring program correctness and improve self-documenting the code.

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9  
@Brian, i have not said that. The question is about when you pass the argument by value. In this case, it's an implementation detail when you put const at the top-level and make the parameter itself const thereby. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 12 '09 at 14:09
3  
@San Jacinto - The caller already knows that it's not going to modified on return from the function, because it's not returned from the function: it's pass by value, so you'e passing in a copy and getting nothing out. As for whether the callee modifies his local copy, that's an implementation detail (in the CPP file not in the header). –  ChrisW Oct 12 '09 at 14:37
5  
@gab: But you cannot overload it on the constness of a parameter past by value. Hence litb's excellent suggestion. –  sbi Oct 12 '09 at 14:38
2  
I understand the technical differences. What I am saying is that as a programmer using someone else's code, I want the assurance that my foo is going to be the same coming back out, or I want to know that it COULD be changed inside the other guy's code. Additionally, I don't want to look. I guess, however, that there is a lot to be said for the fact that later on down the line the other guy can change it back without letting me know, and now I'm equally screwed. –  San Jacinto Oct 12 '09 at 14:48
3  
San, are you sure you're not trying this with references? int foo(int &) and int foo(const int &) are indeed different. –  avakar Oct 12 '09 at 16:34

I recommend reading Herb Sutter. Exceptional C++. There is a chapter "Const-Correctness".

"In fact, to the compiler, the function signature is the same whether you include this const in front of a value parameter or not."

It means that this signature

void print(int number);

is effectively the same as this:

void print(int const number);

So, to the compiler there is no difference how you declare a function. And you can't overload it by putting the const keyword in front of a pass by value parameter.

Read further, what Herb Sutter recommends:

"Avoid const pass-by-value parameters in function declarations. Still make the parameter const in the same function's definition if it won't be modified."

He recommends to avoid this:

void print(int const number);

Because that const is confusing, verbose and redundant.

But in the definition, you should do that (if you won't change the parameter):

void print(int const number)
{
   // I don't want to change the number accidentally here
   ...
}

So, you'll be sure that even after 1000 lines of function's body you always have the number untouched. The compiler will prohibit you from passing the number as a non-const reference to another function.

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8  
1000 lines of funcion body? Ouch! –  Gabriel Nov 15 '11 at 15:28
    
Yeah, it's not so rare –  Vanuan Nov 15 '11 at 22:50
1  
I think the Const-Correctness of Exceptional C++ you mentioned is one of the one at: gotw.ca/gotw/006.htm –  Flexo Nov 17 '11 at 23:28
2  
Yes, the whole book is based on gotw. But the book explains it better, IMO. –  Vanuan Nov 18 '11 at 12:01

You not only indicate that it will not change, it will prevent your code from thinking it can and it will be caught at compilation time.

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See Meyers and 'Effective C++' on this, and do use const liberally, especially with pass-by-reference semantics.

In this case of atomic variables, efficiency does not matter but code clarity still benefits.

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4  
I would disagree in the case of a pass by value primitive type. I would do a double take if I saw that in the code, since the callee can't change the value (from the caller's point of view). I would wonder if there is some typo, of if the person writing the code just doesn't understand pass by value. –  Dolphin Oct 12 '09 at 14:16
2  
@Dolphin: Then you should read litb's (as ever) excellent treatment on the subject, learn, and stop to wonder. If whether code feels "natural" or "used to" was a criterion for correctness, nobody would have started to use the STL for all these funny iterators that felt so unnatural at a first glance. –  sbi Oct 12 '09 at 14:36
    
If they had avoided that, maybe we'd have decent support for ranges in C++ by now ;-p –  Steve Jessop Oct 12 '09 at 18:24
    
@onebyone: I'm with you on that, actually. :) I'm not sure about the impact of the removal of concepts, but there is IMO decent range support going to come with C++1x. –  sbi Oct 12 '09 at 19:02
    
@sbi, hmm, i'm with dolphin, he seems to agree with what i say in my answer. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 12 '09 at 2:40

Well, as other have already said, from the point of view of C++ language, the above const has no effect on function signature, i.e. the function type remains the same regardless of whether the const is there or not. The only effect it has at the level of abstract C++ language is that you can't modify this parameter inside the function body.

However, at the lower level, the const modifier applied to the parameter value can have some optimization benefits, given a sufficiently clever compiler. Consider two functions with the same parameter set (for simplicity)

int foo(const int a, const double b, const long c) {
   /* whatever */
}

void bar(const int a, const double b, const long c) {
   /* whatever */
}

Let's say somewhere in the code they are called as follows

foo(x, d, m);
bar(x, d, m);

Normally, compilers prepare stack frame with arguments before they call a function. In this case the stack will usually be prepared twice: once for each call. But a clever compiler might realize that since these functions do not change their local parameter values (declared with const), the argument set prepared for the first call can be safely reused for the second call. Thus it can prepare the stack only once.

This is a rather rare and obscure optimization, which can only work when the definition of the function is known at the point of the call (either same translation unit, or an advanced globally-optimizing compiler), but sometimes it might be worth mentioning.

It is not correct to say that it is "worthless" or "has no effect", even though with a typical compiler this might be the case.

Another consideration that is worth mentioning is of different nature. There are coding standards out there, which require coders not to change the initial parameter values, as in "don't use parameters as ordinary local variables, parameter values should remain unchanged throughout the function". This kinda makes sense, since sometimes it makes it easier to determine what parameter values the function was originally given (while in debugger, inside the body of the function). To help enforce this coding standard, people might use const specifiers on parameter values. Whether it is worth it or not is a different question...

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1  
I'm afraid this optimization will only be possible if the compiler is able to find out that within the call to foo nothing is going to change x, d, and m - which is harder than you might think. –  sbi Oct 12 '09 at 19:06
3  
No, you missed the point. Once you declare the parameter as 'const' (as in my example), the compiler doesn't have to "find out" anything. It can safely assume that within 'foo' nothing can legally change the value of the argument, which is the very point of using 'const' there. If you somehow manage to "hack" the promise given to the compiler by 'const', it is your own fault and the compiler is not responsible for catching that. The behavior is undefined and all bets are off. This is precisely how 'const' works and always worked in C/C++. –  AndreyT Oct 12 '09 at 19:14
4  
I think sbi has aliasing in mind. For all the compiler knows, the implementation of foo has access to a pointer to x (perhaps it's stored in a global, or reached via some other parameter). foo might write to that, with the side-effect of modifying x, even though a (foo's copy of x) is const. Then the value which must be passed to bar is the new value of x, not the old one which was passed to foo. Unless the compiler can rule this out, it can't pass the potentially "stale" copy of x as the parameter to bar. So it is harder than you might think, because aliasing is usually hard to rule out. –  Steve Jessop Oct 12 '09 at 19:53
1  
.. basically if foo writes to any int, unsigned int, or char value via a pointer or reference, or calls any code out of line that does this or can't be analysed, then the optimisation isn't possible. And that's even with strict aliasing rules enabled - without them, if foo writes to anything via any pointer or reference, then you're done for. In both cases, DFA could in theory save the day by proving that in fact the pointer is not an alias, if the compiler can figure out what it does point to, or (more likely) figure out that x, d and m never have their addresses taken. –  Steve Jessop Oct 12 '09 at 20:30
1  
@onebyone: Thanks, you nailed it. (Although I have no idea what "DFA" stands for.) Essentially: It is possible, but harder than most people think it is. –  sbi Oct 13 '09 at 9:02

You're correct, the only purpose of "const int age" is that age can not be changed. This can be however very confusing for most of programmers. So if these approach is not used widely in your code, I'd advice to omit const.

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3  
"the only purpose of "const int age" is that age can not be changed" You're saying this as if it was some small thing. IMO the ability to have the compiler check const-correctness is one of C++' greatest strengths. –  sbi Oct 12 '09 at 14:42
5  
I'm all for writing understandable code, but not in exchange for losing out on a compile time check. That said, if this approach is "not used widely in your code", I'd say that your team needs some education and/or better code reviews so that it becomes widely used. –  JeffH Oct 12 '09 at 14:58
1  
It almost seems that pass by value should be const by default, doesn't it? And yet this is not a construct that you see in real code very often - in fact I don't think I've ever seen it. –  Mark Ransom Oct 12 '09 at 19:03
1  
@litb: This is where you are wrong. It is not confusing code. It is safe code. Perhaps you are not used to making your code safe but the extra effort at best makes the compiler optimize your code and at worst nothing less than a safeguard! –  Partial Nov 12 '09 at 5:21
1  
@idimba: On the contrary, it actually optimize the code since in the assembler you will have only one variable that will stay the same as opposed to having many variables. On a big project, it will be even more worth while if you use the keyword 'const'. At the same time, with 'const' you get a free check when the code is being compiled to see verify that the constant remains the same. What prevents the compiler from optimizing the code is the keyword 'volatile' which is really useful when doing a multithreaded application! –  Partial Nov 16 '09 at 3:03

You should use const on a parameter if (and only if) you would use it on any other local variable that won't be modified:

const int age_last_year = age - YEAR;

It's sometimes handy to mark local variables const where possible, since it means you can look at the declaration and know that's the value, without thinking about intermediate code. You can easily change it in future (and make sure you haven't broken the code in the function, and maybe change the name of the variable if it now represents something slightly different, which is changeable, as opposed to the previous non-changing thing).

As against that, it does make the code more verbose, and in a short function it's almost always very obvious which variables change and which don't.

So, either:

void MyFunction(const int age, House &purchased_house)
{
    const int age_last_year = age - YEAR;
}

or:

void MyFunction(int age, House &purchased_house)
{
    int age_last_year = age - YEAR;
}
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One benefit of using const is that you cannot accidentally change the value of age in the middle of MyFunction (in the event you forgot it was not pass by reference). One "disadvantage" is that you can't recycle age with code like foo.process(++age);.

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foo.process(++age) should be fine since the const applies to what process can do to the argument - int age is mutable... it is converted to const int when it is accessed within the function. –  D.Shawley Oct 12 '09 at 14:21
    
@D.Shawley: I said foo.process(++age);, not MyFunction(++age, bar); –  Brian Oct 12 '09 at 16:15

Second variant is better. In the first one you can accidently change variable age.

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Maybe you need to change it without creating another variable. –  Justicle Nov 12 '09 at 5:40
1  
@Justicle: Why? Your program will be much clearer if you define a new variable and modify that. The compiler should optimize it out, so you get the same compiled assembly, but it's easier to read and maintain (for example, you may later discover that you need the original parameter value late in the function). –  Ethan Jun 13 '11 at 22:51

Having a primitive type that is passed by value const is pretty much worthless. Passing a const to a function is generally useful as a contract with the caller that the funciton will not change the value. In this case, because the int is passed by value, the function can't make any changes that will be visible outside the function.

On the other hand, rreferences and non trivial object types should always use const if there is not going to be any changes made to the object. In theory this might allow for some optimization, but the big win is the contract I mentioned above. The downside is of course, that it can make your interface much larger, and const it a tough thing to retrofit into an existing system (or with a 3rd party API not using const everywhere).

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Here are some great articles and a book I found explaining the advantages of using const:


Can I propose the following maxim to you?

If an object/variable can be qualified has being constant, it should be. At worst, it will not cost anything. At best, you will be documenting the role of the object/variable in your code and it will allow the compiler the opportunity to optimize your code even more.

Some compilers neglect to exploit the potential of optimization with the use of 'const' and that has lead many experts to neglect the use of constant parameters by value when it could be used. This practice takes more strictness, but it will not be harmful. At worst, you do not lose anything , but you do not gain anything too and at best, you win from using this approach.


For those who do not seem to understand the utility of a const in a by value parameter of a function/method... here is a short example that explains why:

.cpp

void WriteSequence(int const *, const int);

int main()
{
    int Array[] = { 2, 3, 4, 10, 12 };
    WriteSequence(Array, 5);
}


#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
void WriteSequence(int const *Array, const int MAX)
{
    for (int const * i = Array; i != Array + MAX; ++i)
      cout << *i << endl;
}

What would had happen if I would had removed the const in front of int MAX and I had written MAX + 1 inside like this?

void WriteSequence(int Array[], int MAX)
{
    MAX += MAX;
    for (int * i = Array; i != Array + MAX; ++i)
      cout << *i << endl;
}

Well your program would crash! Now, why would someone write "MAX += MAX;" ? Perhaps human error, maybe the programmer was not feeling well that day or perhaps the programmer simply did not know how to write C/C++ code. If you would have had const, the code would have not even compiled!

Safe code is good code and it does not cost anything to add "const" when you have it!


Here is an answer from a different post for a very similar question:

"const is pointless when the argument is passed by value since you will not be modifying the caller's object."

Wrong.

It's about self-documenting your code and your assumptions.

If your code has many people working on it and your functions are non-trivial then you should mark "const" any and everything that you can. When writing industrial-strength code, you should always assume that your coworkers are psychopaths trying to get you any way they can (especially since it's often yourself in the future).

Besides, as somebody mentioned earlier, it might help the compiler optimize things a bit (though it's a long shot).

Here is the link: answer.

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Well i/we agree it's not pointless to write const for value parameters. It may also add safety. Why do people write raw C code, when they could use java and be "safer"? Because C is fast, and C is lowlevel. Safety is not everything - there are other concerns like readability, clarity. Your main point in this answer is that "const" is useful - i think we all agree. But sticking "const" anywhere - that's what we disagree about. I don't quite get your first two links - they talk about "const" in general, not about "const" for value parameters on the toplevel in particular –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 12 '09 at 19:52
    
And i think this discussion will never end. You have your opinion, which has a well reflected background, and i have my opinion, which also has a well reflected background. Neither of us, i suspect, will "convert" to the other's guy opinion, and so i suspect about most other people involved in this discussion. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 12 '09 at 19:54
1  
@litb: For the first link have a look at the conclusion and for the second link it says to put a const when you can. It is more or less a standard from where I am from to use const and it will finish off my making one's code cleaner. –  Partial Nov 13 '09 at 1:33
1  
@litb: Could you elaborate on why it is not readable to write a const for a data type in a passed by value parameter? If I remember correctly, you will not gain any performance or barely any from passing by reference a primitive data type such as an integer since it will implicitly create a pointer on the integer in order for you to be able to use the variable or constant declared outside of the function/method. Therefore, using a passed by value constant will not create any problem. –  Partial Nov 13 '09 at 1:39
2  
Why aren't you following your advice in your example? If you did, it would be void WriteSequence(int const* const Array, const int MAX). –  Roger Pate Mar 15 '10 at 23:16

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