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I have written a program to create 10 threads and run them normally. The Program is running fine but at the end it gives a segmentation fault. What is this fault, what is causing it, and how do I resolve it? My code is :

#include<stdio.h>
#include<pthread.h>
void *print(void *num);

int main()
{
    pthread_t tid[10];
    int n,check;
    void *exitstatus;
    for(n=1;n<=10;n++)
    {
        check=pthread_create(&tid[n],NULL,print,(void *)&n);
        if(check=0)
            printf("thread created");
        pthread_join(tid[n],&exitstatus);
    }

    return 0;

} 

void *print(void *num)
{
    int i,*val=(int *)num;
    for(i=0;i<(5);i++)
        printf("Hello World!!!(thread %d )\n",*val);
}
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Have you tried using gdb to isolate the source of the error ? – ziu Mar 21 '13 at 12:41

You have many flaws:

for(n=1;n<=10;n++) // No, The array starts from 0 and lasts on 9

Try this

for(n=0;n<10;n++)

if(check=0) // No, this will assign 0 to check instead of compare it

Try this

if(check==0)
share|improve this answer
    
Why does this error comes if we initialize n from 1 and not 0 – user3032010 Mar 21 '13 at 12:49
    
@kanika because arrays in C and other C like languages start at 0 index – Aniket Mar 21 '13 at 12:52

You are accessing an array beyond its index. It is undefined behavior.

your array t[10] starts at index t[0] and should end at t[9] -

for(n = 0; n < 10; n++) { 
 //your stuff
}

Also check == 0 is how you check equality. check = 0 will assign 0 to check

So your code must look like this:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<pthread.h>
void *print(void *num);

int main()
{
    pthread_t tid[10];
    int n,check;
    void *exitstatus;
    for(n = 0; n < 10; n++)
    {
        check=pthread_create(&tid[n], NULL, print, (void *)&n);
        if(check == 0)
            printf("thread created");
        pthread_join(tid[n], &exitstatus);
    }
    return 0;
} 

void *print(void *num)
{
    int i,*val=(int *)num;
    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        printf("Hello World!!!(thread %d )\n", *val);
}

Another important note on programming style: Please use proper indentation and use whitespace judiciously. Most programming errors and bugs can be eliminated if proper indentation and whitespace is used. For example, one white space before and after an operator in the for loop, and between parameters while calling a function after , and before the next parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
One clarification - a SEGFAULT (segmentation fault) means the program accessed a memory address that is invalid for the program. This program accessing past the end of an array is a perfect example of such. Note that C is bad this way. If there were valid memory after the end of the array, the use of &tid[n] would have worked, writing the result over some other potentially useful memory, creating garbage. – ash Aug 25 '13 at 5:14

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