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I'm trying to write a piece of JavaScript code that will allow me to use the arrows to go back and forth in blog posts.

I figured that the easiest and simplest way to do this is to add id tags in the anchors that go to the previous-next posts, then have JavaScript read the href from the anchor.

I Googled and made it work --I believe I found the answers right here-- but I have this problem- the code doesn't work on the first post. I think this is because there is no prev id, and I get a TypeError: document.getElementById(...) is null. This, somehow, stops the execution of code, and I also can't get the href for the prev id.

How do I fix this?

Here is an HTML demo:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">

<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title></title>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        var nextpage;
        var prevpage;

        window.onload=function()
        {
            prevpage = document.getElementById("prev").getAttribute("href");
            nextpage = document.getElementById("next").getAttribute("href");
        }

        document.onkeydown = function(evt)
        {
            evt = evt || window.event;
            switch (evt.keyCode)
            {
                case 37:
                    if (typeof prevpage !== 'undefined') window.location = prevpage;
                    break;
                case 39:
                    if (typeof nextpage !== 'undefined') window.location = nextpage;
                    break;
            }
        };
    </script>
</head>

<body>

<ul>
    <li class="previous"><a id="prev" href="http://www.yahoo.com">&laquo; <span>Previous Post</span></a></li>
    <li class="next"><a id="next" href="http://www.google.com"><span>Next Post</span> &raquo;</a></li>
</ul>

</body>

</html>
share|improve this question
1  
Just test if document.getElementById("prev") is not null then.. –  Fabrício Matté Mar 21 '13 at 12:47
1  
"This, somehow, stops the execution of code" Well of course it stops because there is an error! –  epascarello Mar 21 '13 at 12:48
    
You really should use <link type="next" href="…">/<link type="prev" href="…"> in <head> for that –  Bergi Mar 21 '13 at 13:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In that case you must test if document.getElementById() returns a DOM element reference or null, as trying to access a property of null results in an error.

window.onload=function()
{
    var prevpage = document.getElementById("prev"),
        nextpage = document.getElementById("next");
    document.onkeydown = function(evt)
    {
        evt = evt || window.event;
        switch (evt.keyCode)
        {
            case 37:
                if (prevpage) window.location = prevpage.href;
                break;
            case 39:
                if (nextpage) window.location = nextpage.href;
                break;
        }
    };
};

null is considered a falsy value, hence it won't enter the if block inside of your switch.

Assuming next/prev are anchors <a> you can access their href properties directly without using getAttribute.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This helped me find the answer. –  jsmith6 Mar 21 '13 at 13:47

It will throw an error if you try to read the attribute of something that is null. So you need to test that it exists before you read it.

    window.onload=function()
    {

        var prevElem = document.getElementById("prev");
        var nextElem = document.getElementById("next");

        prevpage = prevElem ? prevElem.href || null;
        nextpage = nextElem ? nextElem.href || null;
    }

    document.onkeydown = function(evt)
    {
        evt = evt || window.event;
        switch (evt.keyCode)
        {
            case 37:
                if (prevpage) window.location = prevpage;
                break;
            case 39:
                if (nextpage) window.location = nextpage;
                break;
        }
    };
share|improve this answer

I found the problem.

prevpage = document.getElementById("prev").getAttribute("href"); gives a TypeError, which stops the execution. What I need to do is first check if document.getElementById("prev") is null. If it's not, then I can getAttribute("href")

I need getAttribute("href") because I want to grab the local file --ie post30.html, not http://www.example.com/post30.html. I forgot to mention that.

This is what the code should look like:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">

<head>
   <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title></title>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        var nextpage;
       var prevpage;

       window.onload=function()
        {   
           var temp;

           temp = document.getElementById("prev");  
            if (temp) prevpage = temp.getAttribute("href")

           temp = document.getElementById("next");
            if (temp) nextpage = temp.getAttribute("href")

        }

       document.onkeydown = function(evt)
        {
           evt = evt || window.event;
            switch (evt.keyCode)
            {
                case 37:
                    if (prevpage) window.location = prevpage;
                    break;
                case 39:
                    if (nextpage) window.location = nextpage;
                    break;
            }
        };
    </script>
</head>

<body>

<ul>
    <li class="previous"><a id="prev" href="next.html">&laquo; <span>Previous Post</span></a></li>
    <li class="next"><a id="next" href="prev.html"><span>Next Post</span> &raquo;</a></li>
</ul>

</body>

</html>
share|improve this answer

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