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I have file with following entries:

1,2
2,3
4,5
1,3
1,4
5,6
...

This tells the ids: first column matches with second column. Now I want to find all id groups that are having all combinations only. i.e. the following needs to be output:

1,2,3
4,5
1,4
5,6

I tried to write a perl script for the solution:

while(<STDIN>) {
    if(m/^(\d+),(\d+)/) {
        $dub{$1}{$2} = 1;
        $dub{$2}{$1} = 1;
        $hs{$1} = 1;
        $hs{$2} = 1;
    }
}

$i=0;
foreach $a (keys %dub) {
    $grp[$i]{$a} = 1;
    foreach $b (keys %{$dub{$a}}) {
        $grp[$i]{$b} = 1;
        foreach $c (keys %hs) {
            if($c == $a || $c == $b) { next; }
            $flag = 1;
            foreach $d (keys %{$grp[$i]}) {
                if(!$dub{$d}{$c}) {
                    $flag = 0;
                    last;
                }
            }
            $grp[$i]{$c} = 1 if($flag);
        }
        $i++;
    }
}

for($i=0; $i<=$#grp; $i++) {
    print join(",", (keys %{$grp[$i]}))."\n";
}

But this takes hell lot of time for execution. Is there a better solution, algorithm or performance tune for above script? Any solution in LAMP is appreciated. Thanks

EDIT:

Think of this way: (1,2) is defined as "1 and 2 are similar" (2,3) is defined as "2 and 3 are similar" (1,4) is defined as "1 and 4 are similar" (1,3) is defined as "1 and 3 are similar"

From these similarities I conclude that group (1,2,3) are similar to each other but not group (1,2,3,4). In order to form group (1,2,3,4) there should be other entries in data as (2,4) and (3,4).

Finally I wanted to find all groups in given set of co-ordinates.

share|improve this question
    
4 levels of loops? I can't imagine why you'd need all of them. – Anirudh Ramanathan Mar 21 '13 at 13:43
    
I somehow feel that someArray[i][j]++; woudl work out too... (of course given the fact you properly calculate size - or dynamicly add elemtens ) – Najzero Mar 21 '13 at 13:51
    
dark: Sorry to post one of my dumb solutions., but that's what I have now. Fred: I need any programming solution. Philip: Can you point me link to that? – Sandeep Kumar Mar 21 '13 at 13:55
    
You should have spent more time explaining what you want done. – TLP Mar 21 '13 at 14:04
    
@SandeepKumar Yeah, that's in the title too. However, your output seems to have some conflicts. You have 1,2 and 2,3 and 1,3 making 1,2,3, but 1,4 is not in there? – TLP Mar 21 '13 at 14:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

From my understanding, {1,2,3} are in the same group because all point to each other ({1,2}, {2,3},{1,3} exist). So, we can reduce this problem to finding cliques in an undirected graph, which is NP-Complete problem. So, every solution will be quite inefficient on big data.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you point me to any tools that solves this NP-Compute problem? – Sandeep Kumar Mar 22 '13 at 5:09
    
Graph::Clique can solve it,but you need to iterate over each clique size up to the maximum clique size you know. – Mattan Mar 22 '13 at 7:07
    
Yes this is what I'm looking for. I just need to benchmark with my existing solution. But I believe this is better than my solution. I never know maximum clique size from given data. My data will be around 20 to 30 Millions of co-ordinates. The best result should be the group which has maximum clique size in my case. – Sandeep Kumar Mar 22 '13 at 7:35
    
I'm not sure if this module is the right choice for you on ~30 millions records, as it uses regex to solve it. Give it a try, it will be interesting to compare it with the conventional solutions :) – Mattan Mar 22 '13 at 8:06
    
Anyway, my point was that any solution will be inefficient here on huge amount of data. This is because all of the solution will be somewhere in the EXP complexity class. just try to run for(my $i=0;$i<2^1000;$i++) {print "$i\n"} and see how long does it take. There are, of course, better solutions than others, and I advice you to study the problem. And if performance is what you care about, maybe Perl is not the right choice for this problem. Look for a C implementation of Clique problem to gain maximum performance. – Mattan Mar 22 '13 at 8:21

This works for me:

use Data::Dump;

my @results;
my ($last_a, $last_b) = (0,0);

while(<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    my ($a, $b) = split /,/;
    if( $last_b == $a ) {
        my $last_item = $results[$#results];
        push @$last_item, $b;
    }
    else {
        push @results, [$a, $b];
    }
    ($last_a,  $last_b) = ($a, $b);
}

dd @results; # ([1, 2, 3], [4, 5], [1, 3], [1, 4], [5, 6])

__DATA__
1,2
2,3
4,5
1,3
1,4
5,6
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for quick reply, but its not working for the following i/p: 1,2 7,8 2,3 4,5 1,3 1,4 5,6 – Sandeep Kumar Mar 21 '13 at 14:24
    
@SandeepKumar Is i/p meant to be an abbreviation for "input"? – TLP Mar 21 '13 at 14:35
    
please, update your question and put a set of test cases and the expected result – Miguel Prz Mar 21 '13 at 15:32

You haven't really described the algorithm that we're supposed to used. I can't really understand why your input generates "1,2,3" and "1,4" rather than just "1,2,3,4".

But is this what you want?

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my %data;
while (<DATA>) {
  chomp;
  my ($k, $v) = split /,/;
  push @{ $data{$k} }, $v;
}

foreach (sort keys %data) {
  say "$_,", join ',', @{ $data{$_ } };
}

__DATA__
1,2
2,3
4,5
1,3
1,4
5,6
share|improve this answer
    
Think of this way: (1,2) is defined as "1 and 2 are similar" (2,3) is defined as "2 and 3 are similar" (1,4) is defined as "1 and 4 are similar" (1,3) is defined as "1 and 3 are similar" From these similarities I conclude that group (1,2,3) are similar to each other but not group (1,2,3,4). In order to form group (1,2,3,4) there should be other entries in data as (2,4), (3,4) Finally I wanted to find all groups in given set of co-ordinates. (Sorry for my poor posts) – Sandeep Kumar Mar 22 '13 at 4:49

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