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I want to do a specific sort. I am using java's comparable interface which means the return of my compare method must return -1 +1 or 0 depending on the equality of the two compared, then I am sorting using Collections. My trouble comes from how I wish to compare.

I have a key that is made up of either of the following

[keyName]  
[siteName].[keyName]  
[siteName].[pageName].[keyName]  

so as an example "mysite.alampshade.color"

the tricky part is the sites must be sorted first, followed by keyname, followed by pageName. but firstly by the keynames, then site name, in the order of the number of sections to the property. Sorry. its a little complicated, an example may help. here is the order they must be:

alpha  
beta  
charlie  
sitea.alpha  
sitea.charlie  
sitea.pagea.beta  
sitea.pageb.beta  
sitea.pagea.charlie  
siteb.alpha  
siteb.delta  
siteb.pagef.alpha  
siteb.pageb.echo  
siteb.pageb.golf  
siteb.pagea.hotel  
siteb.pageb.hotel  
siteb.pagec.hotel  

I have tried many different ways and have thrown away code a few times but still cant get it perfect. some pseudocode would be of great help if not some java.

EDIT: to add another possibly simplier to understand example the following is sorted how I need it

a  
b  
c  
z  
a.b  
a.c  
a.d  
a.z  
a.b.a  
a.c.a  
a.b.b  
a.b.c  
a.c.c  
a.a.d  
b.a  
b.b  
b.z  
b.a.a  
b.b.a  
b.a.b  
c.c.f  
share|improve this question
2  
You say "firstly the order of the number of sections" but you list sitea.pagea.charlie before siteb.alpha . Which is it? –  Will Mar 21 '13 at 14:14
    
true. I have updated question –  Mark W Mar 21 '13 at 14:29
    
@MarkW I've updated my answer, it was incomplete and Roger pointed it out. Now it should be good. I've also commented my code so that it's more readable. –  LaGrandMere Mar 21 '13 at 15:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another option, making it recursive you avoid the problem if there is ever more entries.

import java.util.ArrayList; import java.util.Arrays; import java.util.Comparator; import java.util.List;

public class SortTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String[] test = new String[]{
            "a",
            "b",
            "b.a",
            "b.a.a",
            "a.a.a",
            "a.b.a",
            "a.a",
            "a.b",
            "b.a.b",
            "b.b.a"
        };

        Arrays.sort(test, new Comparator<String>() {

        int compareComplexList(List<String> a, List<String> b, List<int[]> positions, int order ) {

          int minimum = a.size() < b.size() ? a.size() - 1 : b.size() - 1;   

          if (a.get(positions.get(minimum)[order]).compareTo(b.get(positions.get(minimum)[order])) != 0)
                return a.get(positions.get(minimum)[order]).compareTo(b.get(positions.get(minimum)[order]));
          else if (order < minimum - 1) return compareComplexList(a,b, positions, ++order);
          else return Double.compare(a.size(),b.size());
        }

        public int compare(String a, String b) {
          List<String> partsA = Arrays.asList(a.split("\\."));
          List<String> partsB = Arrays.asList(b.split("\\."));
          List<int[]>  orders = new ArrayList<int[]>();

          orders.add(new int[] {0});
          orders.add(new int[] {0,1});
          orders.add(new int[] {0,2,1});

          return compareComplexList(partsA, partsB, orders,0);
        }
        });
        System.out.println("Sorted: "+Arrays.toString(test));
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I am using java 6, on java 7 you should be ok to go with Integer.compare which would be much better. –  pedromarce Mar 21 '13 at 16:46
    
Thanks. this is nicely done, but does not quite sort in order I want. This sorts number of parts first, followed by part 1 followed by part 2 followed by part 3. I need 2 and 3 swapped, and then prioritise part1 sort order over number of parts sort order –  Mark W Mar 21 '13 at 17:03
    
Got it wrong from the requirements... should be ok now. –  pedromarce Mar 21 '13 at 17:16
    
Forget it, that swap between 2 and 3 is not there... –  pedromarce Mar 21 '13 at 17:18
    
its a pig of an algorithm. I have tried many times, even from fresh a few times –  Mark W Mar 21 '13 at 17:19

Should be good now.

public int compare(String a, String b) {
String[] partsA = a.split("\\.");
String[] partsB = b.split("\\.");

// If first term is different, we exit.
if (partsA[0].compareTo(partsB[0]) != 0) return partsA[0].compareTo(partsB[0]);

// Else, first term is identical.
else {
    // Same number of parts
    if (partsA.length == partsB.length) {
        // 2 parts, we compare the 2nd part.
        if (partsA.length == 2) {
            return partsA[1].compareTo(partsB[1]);
        // 3 parts, we compare the 3rd part first, then the 2nd part        
        } else {
            if (partsA[2].compareTo(partsB[2]) != 0) return partsA[2].compareTo(partsB[2]);
            return partsA[1].compareTo(partsB[1]);
        }

    // Different number of parts
    } else {
        // If A has only 1 part, it's first
        if (partsA.length == 1) return -1;
        // If B has only 1 part, it's first
        if (partsB.length == 1) return 1;

        // Case 2 vs 3 parts, we compare the 3rd part with the 2nd part of the other. If it's equal, the shorter is first.
        if (partsA.length == 3) {
            if (partsA[2].compareTo(partsB[1]) != 0) return partsA[2].compareTo(partsB[1]);
            else return 1;
        } else {
            if (partsA[1].compareTo(partsB[2]) != 0) return partsA[1].compareTo(partsB[2]);
            else return -1;
        }           
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be right now. I couldn't get it to work with a loop, so this doesn't look nice, but there is little to do about that... –  Vincent van der Weele Mar 21 '13 at 14:28
    
what is String.compare(foo, bar)? –  Kent Mar 21 '13 at 14:37
    
Doesn't the first if return the wrong answer comparing "sitea.pagea.keya" with "siteb.keya"? –  Roger Lindsjö Mar 21 '13 at 15:10
    
@RogerLindsjö you're right ! There's a mistake in it. I'm correcting it rigth now. Thanks :) –  LaGrandMere Mar 21 '13 at 15:17
    
there is no String.compare(String String) method. Is that 1.7? –  Mark W Mar 21 '13 at 16:31

My other answer started getting too gnarly. Here's a better, more natural solution:

public class StrangeComparator {
  private static class Entry implements Comparable<Entry> {
    // What to split with.
    static final String dot = Pattern.quote(".");
    // The parts.
    final String key;
    final String page;
    final String site;

    public Entry(String s) {
      String [] parts = s.split(dot);
      switch (parts.length) {
        case 1:
          key = parts[0];
          page = "";
          site = "";
          break;

        case 2:
          key = parts[1];
          page = "";
          site = parts[0];
          break;

        case 3:
          key = parts[2];
          page = parts[1];
          site = parts[0];
          break;

        default:
          throw new IllegalArgumentException("There must be at least one part to an entry.");
      }
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Entry t) {
      int diff = site.compareTo(t.site);
      if ( diff == 0 ) {
        diff = page.compareTo(t.page);
      }
      if ( diff == 0 ) {
        diff = key.compareTo(t.key);
      }
      return diff;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString () {
      return (site.length() > 0 ? site + "." : "")
              + (page.length() > 0 ? page + "." : "")
              + key;
    }
  }

  public void test() {
    String[] test = new String[]{
      "alpha",
      "beta",
      "charlie",
      "zeta", // Added to demonstrate correctness.
      "sitea.alpha",
      "sitea.charlie",
      "sitea.pagea.beta",
      "sitea.pageb.beta",
      "sitea.pagea.charlie",
      "siteb.alpha",
      "siteb.delta",
      "siteb.pagef.alpha",
      "siteb.pageb.echo",
      "siteb.pageb.golf",
      "siteb.pagea.hotel",
      "siteb.pageb.hotel",
      "siteb.pagec.hotel"
    };
    Arrays.sort(test);
    System.out.println("Normal sort: " + Separator.separate("\n", "\n", test));
    Entry[] entries = new Entry[test.length];
    for ( int i = 0; i < test.length; i++ ) {
      entries[i] = new Entry(test[i]);
    }
    Arrays.sort(entries);
    System.out.println("Special sort: " + Separator.separate("\n", "\n", entries));
  }

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    new StrangeComparator().test();
  }
}

Output order is:

alpha
beta
charlie
zeta
sitea.alpha
sitea.charlie
sitea.pagea.beta
sitea.pagea.charlie
sitea.pageb.beta
siteb.alpha
siteb.delta
siteb.pagea.hotel
siteb.pageb.echo
siteb.pageb.golf
siteb.pageb.hotel
siteb.pagec.hotel
siteb.pagef.alpha

Which kinda does what you say but doesn't match your example.

share|improve this answer
    
thats almost it. I just need sitea.charlie after sitea.alpha And also siteb.delta after siteb.alpha –  Mark W Mar 21 '13 at 17:17
    
@MarkW - How does that look now? compareTo now compares in order site,page,key, not as you stated. –  OldCurmudgeon Mar 21 '13 at 17:24
    
@MarkW - I've checked this with your new test data and it is correct with that. –  OldCurmudgeon Mar 22 '13 at 0:48
    
a few compile errors in 1.6. What's "Seperator"? - looks like it may work. Your sorting the array in a loop first by size. @pedromarce managed it inside the comparator class which I'd prefer. So I have awarded answer to him. But I like your thinking +1 –  Mark W Mar 22 '13 at 8:52

Here's an alternative - if a component is found to contain less that 3 parts then parts are added at the start to take up the slack. It then uses a sort order array to define which columns should be compared next:

  public void test() {
    String[] test = new String[]{
      "alpha",
      "beta",
      "charlie",
      "zeta", // Added to demonstrate correctness.
      "sitea.alpha",
      "sitea.charlie",
      "sitea.pagea.beta",
      "sitea.pageb.beta",
      "sitea.pagea.charlie",
      "siteb.alpha",
      "siteb.delta",
      "siteb.pagef.alpha",
      "siteb.pageb.echo",
      "siteb.pageb.golf",
      "siteb.pagea.hotel",
      "siteb.pageb.hotel",
      "siteb.pagec.hotel"
    };
    Arrays.sort(test);
    System.out.println("Normal sort: "+Arrays.toString(test));
    Arrays.sort(test, new Comparator<String>() {
      // How many columns to pad to.
      final int padTo = 3;
      // What to pad with.
      final String padWith = "";
      // What order to compare the resultant columns in.
      final int[] order = {0, 2, 1};

      @Override
      public int compare(String s1, String s2) {
        String[] s1parts = padArray(s1.split(Pattern.quote(".")), padTo, padWith);
        String[] s2parts = padArray(s2.split(Pattern.quote(".")), padTo, padWith);
        int diff = 0;
        for ( int i = 0; diff == 0 && i < order.length; i++ ) {
          diff = s1parts[order[i]].compareTo(s2parts[order[i]]);
        }
        return diff;
      }

      String [] padArray(String[] array, int padTo, String padWith) {
        String [] padded = new String[padTo];
        for ( int i = 0; i < padded.length; i++ ) {
          padded[padded.length - i - 1] = i < array.length ? array[i]: padWith;
        }
        return padded;
      }
    });
    System.out.println("Special sort: "+Arrays.toString(test));
  }

prints (more or less):

Normal sort: [alpha,
 beta,
 charlie,
 sitea.alpha,
 sitea.charlie,
 sitea.pagea.beta,
 sitea.pagea.charlie,
 sitea.pageb.beta,
 siteb.alpha,
 siteb.delta,
 siteb.pagea.hotel,
 siteb.pageb.echo,
 siteb.pageb.golf,
 siteb.pageb.hotel,
 siteb.pagec.hotel,
 siteb.pagef.alpha,
 zeta]
Special sort: [alpha,
 beta,
 charlie,
 sitea.alpha,
 sitea.charlie,
 siteb.alpha,
 siteb.delta,
 zeta,
 siteb.pagef.alpha,
 sitea.pagea.beta,
 sitea.pageb.beta,
 sitea.pagea.charlie,
 siteb.pageb.echo,
 siteb.pageb.golf,
 siteb.pagea.hotel,
 siteb.pageb.hotel,
 siteb.pagec.hotel]

There does seem to be some ambiguity in your requirements but this code is structured so you can, with trivial tweaks, achieve most interpretations of your comparison quite simply.

share|improve this answer
    
did you compare your output to OP's example output? –  Kent Mar 21 '13 at 14:51
    
Yes - thus my "ambiguity" comment and the addition of the "zeta" value to demonstrate the ambiguities. Ahh!! I see OP wants site,key,page - I have given key, page, site. I will tweak. –  OldCurmudgeon Mar 21 '13 at 14:56
    
anyway, I got lost in OP's example output...... –  Kent Mar 21 '13 at 14:58
    
yeah sorry guys it is a little confusing. if you have any questions I'll be happy to try to clear it up. –  Mark W Mar 21 '13 at 16:32
    
@MarkW - Is my output correct? If not what should it be? –  OldCurmudgeon Mar 21 '13 at 16:34

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