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I am trying to create classes that hold contact information and address information for customers.

I am currently trying to overload methods in hopes of condensing my code and making it easier to read while doing the same thing that various methods would do. ALSO, I am using NUnit because these are integration tests that I am creating, so that is where the random generator came from. Here is what I have so far:

  public static Address BuildAddress()
    {
        var gen = new RandomGenerator();
        return BuildAddress(gen.Phrase(10));
    }

    //build a billing address
    public static AddressInfo BuildAddress(string name)
    {
        return BuildAddress(name, "USA");
    }

    public static Address BuildAddress(string name, string country)
    {
        var gen = new RandomGenerator();

        var address = Builder<AddressInfo>.CreateNew()
            .With(x => x.Name = name)
            .And((x => x.Address1 = gen.Int() + " " + gen.Phrase(10) + " Street"))
            .And(x => x.City = gen.Phrase(15))
            .And(x => x.StateOrProvince = gen.Phrase(2))
            .And(x => x.Country = country)
            .And(x => x.PostalCode = "32561").
            Build();

        return address;

I made this but I also was thinking I needed to add another block of code for mailing address. Please let me know if there is a shorter way to do this.

Thanks!

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Shorter way of generating dummy data you mean? –  Yahya Mar 21 '13 at 14:13
2  
I am not sure I completely understand your question. Do you mean something like public static Address BuildAddress(string name, string country = "USA")? –  odyss-jii Mar 21 '13 at 14:14
    
@Yahya yes that is what I mean! –  CSharpDev4Evr Mar 21 '13 at 14:29
1  
@Dev-123 Unfortunately, I don't think you will be able to get dummy data quickly other than writing some code yourself. But you can create mock data and try to reuse it wherever you like. And only populate things which are needed in respective unit tests. –  Yahya Mar 21 '13 at 14:32
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I understand correctly, you want to shorten the above code i.e. the method overload chain you have... You could use a default propery i.e.:

public static Address BuildAddress(string name, int phrase = 10, string country = "USA")
{
        var gen = new RandomGenerator();

        var address = Builder<AddressInfo>.CreateNew()
            .With(x => x.Name = name)
            .And((x => x.Address1 = gen.Int() + " " + gen.Phrase(10) + " Street"))
            .And(x => x.City = gen.Phrase(15))
            .And(x => x.StateOrProvince = gen.Phrase(2))
            .And(x => x.Country = country)
            .And(x => x.PostalCode = "32561").
            Build();

        return address;
}

You can then call it like..

ClassName.BuilderAddress("my name");

Or..

ClassName.BuilderAddress("my name", 5);

Or..

ClassName.BuilderAddress("my name", 7, "Ireland");

Suggested answer to your comment below: (not 100% sure on this one)

public static T BuildAddress(string name, int phrase = 10, string country = "USA")
{
        var gen = new RandomGenerator();

        var address = Builder<T>.CreateNew()
            .With(x => x.Name = name)
            .And((x => x.Address1 = gen.Int() + " " + gen.Phrase(10) + " Street"))
            .And(x => x.City = gen.Phrase(15))
            .And(x => x.StateOrProvince = gen.Phrase(2))
            .And(x => x.Country = country)
            .And(x => x.PostalCode = "32561").
            Build();

        return address;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. but I also wanted to create another method that would have the same information but be for mailing address. I was wondering if adding another method would be the most efficient way to go about this or if there is another way. –  CSharpDev4Evr Mar 21 '13 at 14:20
    
Well you could use a generic method so it doesn't matter what the type is as long as it shares the same properties: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/twcad0zb(v=vs.80).aspx I think that is another question though.. ? –  Seany84 Mar 21 '13 at 14:24
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You may want to consider optional and named parameters.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd264739.aspx

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