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I am modelling a loan database for a friend.

A Customer can have 0 to N Addresses (street address or POBox address or even more than 1 street addresses and more than on POBox addresses). A Property must have only one Address. A Company (employment info) must have only one Address.

It will be better to have a separate Addresses table for the Customers table. The address for Property and Company can go with Properties and Companies table.

But since we have an Addresses table here, do you think it is a good idea or not to share that Addresses table for Companies and Properties tables as well?

When we think about the relationship between entities, we should cut off a time point (static way?) or we should view a certain range of the time (dynamic way?) to analyze their relationship? For example, a company can only have ONE address at certain time point but that company may moved from one place to another recently. Then a company may have more than one address for a certain range of time.

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3 Answers 3

Customer would be better with a 1 to N than a 0 to N relationship, since you are making loans you might want to know where their address.

A Company (employment info) must have only one address.

Then a company may have more than one address for a certain range of time.

You are contradicting yourself a bit, why would you need the two address? I think the company will have their official just one address till they get everything on the new address at which point you can update your DB to the new one.

But since we have an Addresses table here, do you think it is a good idea or not to share that Addresses table for Companies and Properties tables as well?

Yes

And here a nice link with some ideas on modelling:

http://www.databaseanswers.org/data_models/

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good questions about assumptions, +1 for that. –  Nathan Hughes Mar 21 '13 at 15:03

A Company (employment info) must have only one Address.

Not necessarily. A Company can have a mailing address and a physical address.

Since we have an Addresses table here, do you think it is a good idea or not to share that Addresses table for Companies and Properties tables as well?

Yes, it's a good idea to put addresses in the Addresses table. Your Properties table would have an address row foreign key, and your Companies table would have 2 foreign keys, one for a mailing address and one for a physical address. The mailing address would be an optional (nullable) foreign key.

You would need a CuustomerAddress table to maintain the 0 to N relationship between Customer and Address. If you want, you can also have a 0 to N relationship between Address and Customer.

The table would look like this.

CustomerAddress
---------------
CustomerAddress ID
Customer ID
Address ID

The CustomerAddress ID is the primary (clustering) index. It is an ascending integer or long, or some other unique ID.

You would have a unique indexon (Customer ID, Address ID).

If you want to associate addresses with customers, you would have another unique index on (Address ID, Customer ID).

A company can only have ONE address at certain time point but that company may moved from one place to another recently. Then a company may have more than one address for a certain range of time.

If this information is important, then you have to include a date written column in your CompanyAddress table. You would create a unique index on (Company ID, Date written descending). This way, the first row you retrieve from the Address table would be the most current address.

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why the CustomerAddress table is necessary for a 0-n relationship? Usually a relationship table is for n-n relationship, right? –  5YrsLaterDBA Mar 21 '13 at 15:14
1  
It's not necessary, unless you want to associate addresses with customers. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Mar 21 '13 at 15:38

It seems like a very popular idea to put all Addresses in their own table. Developers love to seek out repetition and eliminate it. But in this case I would hesitate to dignify addresses with Entity status by putting them in their own dedicated table, because if, like most applications, you don't treat addresses as full-fledged entities, this gets overcomplicated.

If you treated addresses as real entities then if two companies somehow shared the same address, or one inhabited a location for a while, then another one inhabited that same location, then those companies would reference the same address. Because when your application was accepting an address as input it would go see if there was an existing address and reference it rather than just slam some garbage into the address table. Which one do you intend to do? I expect it's the slam one, which is fine, because like most business applications you totally don't care if the new address you're putting in is the same as some other address already in the database, you have no interest in tracking the addresses as individual things. And that's the difference between entities and cat food.

So with the consolidation we have to introduce an intersection table, and index it, and all our entities that have addresses have to join to it, we have to think about whether to get the address eagerly or use lazy loading. We chucked all the addresses into one bucket and have to work to make sure everybody can get to their own address quickly. For real entities this makes some sense because different things need to link to the same entity, but we established above that we don't care about that, nobody is sharing these entries.

Where's the repetition we're eliminating by consolidating addresses into one table? The addresses are going to end up in the database somewhere regardless, with the same fields, we're not saving space. The only repetition is in the DDL used to generate the schema, which we can manage by making a reusable component (where "component" is the Hibernate term) for the address (which addresses redundancy in the application code) and using the ORM tool to generate the schema. Or, worst case, just ignore it, addresses don't change that much, it's not your biggest problem.

These requirements you are describing sound suspiciously enterprise-y for a project you're doing for a friend. Possibly your friend's brain has been poisoned by overexposure to elaborate requirements concocted by committees who don't know what they're doing. It's bad enough we have to put up with this junk at work, but for personal projects? Try to talk him down.

But maybe your friend is outsourcing his enterprise-y work to you and you're stuck with 0-N addresses per customer. If so, contain the damage: make a table exclusively for customer addresses, so you don't need the intersection table, and put the other entities' addresses inline. Making these entities that have only one address go get their address from another table doesn't buy you anything but more joins. If you need history, write it to a separate history table where it's out of the way.

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As AndresL pointed out, a Customer should have 1 or N Address. And as Gilbert pointed out, a Company may have two Address (street and pobox). You have made a very good point that one Address may be shared by more than on Companies. But without change the relationship between the Company and Address tables, we still can satisfy the new requirement. right? Right now the Company table contains two addressId foreign keys. Make Property address inline makes sense. I may go that way. –  5YrsLaterDBA Mar 22 '13 at 14:21
    
@5YrsLaterDBA: putting property inline sounds good. what i'm trying to say is, let what's important to the project drive the database design. –  Nathan Hughes Mar 22 '13 at 14:29

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