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While developing a WPF application, I had tried to stop executions of the application in a non-interactive manner. This application is used in an environment where users submit jobs to a Windows cluster, and sometimes they submit UI codes on accident. These instances end up running on servers until someone recognizes their presence and kills the process.

Following the advice from answers in multiple questions (#1, #2, #3), I implemented the following code using Environment.UserInteractive to halt non-interactive usage:

private void Application_Startup (object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
{
    if (Environment.UserInteractive)
    {
        var window = new MainWindow();
        window.Show();
    }
}

A quick test with the Windows 7 Task Scheduler revealed that the process remained active! Because the task was set to run regardless of whether the user was logged in or not, I do not see a Window anywhere and am not sure whether Environment.UserInteractive returned true.

So how do you detect that a WPF application is running non-interactively?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apparently, the advice was correct and Environment.UserInteractive was returning false. However, what ended up happening was the WPF dispatcher continued regardless of the presence of a window. This becomes apparent when you read the remarks for Application.ShutdownMode:

Applications stop running only when the Shutdown method of the Application is called. Shut down can occur implicitly or explicitly, as specified by the value of the ShutdownMode property.

In order to actually stop a WPF process from running non-interactively you must tell it to stop running!

if (Environment.UserInteractive)
{
    var window = new MainWindow();
    window.Show();
}
else
{
    // This step is important, otherwise the application will continue running
    this.Shutdown(1);
}

Once you add a call to Application.Shutdown, the process will tear down in a nice manner when run non-interactively!

Task Scheduler successfully completed task "\RunTest" , instance "{0d4e6506-b12b-4181-8a75-17754ddef81c}" , action "\\networkshare\path\to\Executable.exe" with return code 1.

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