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In some situations, the Python module Peewee will reset the (non-integer) primary key when saving an object. I have constructed this example to clarify:

#!/usr/bin/python

from peewee import *
import uuid

db = SqliteDatabase('./db/' + str(uuid.uuid4()) + '.db')

class A(Model):
    id = CharField(primary_key=True)
    def __init__(self):
        super(A, self).__init__()
        self.id = str(uuid.uuid4())
    class Meta:
        database = db

class B(A):
    name = CharField()    
    def __init__(self, name):
        super(B, self).__init__()
        self.name = name

A.create_table()
a = A()
print a.id
a.save(force_insert=True)
print a.id
print "--"    
B.create_table()
b = B(name='Test')
print b.id
b.save(force_insert=True)
print b.id

An example output:

$ ./pkey.py 
0bd49fa9-c5cc-40e7-aff7-24e0b17247cb
0bd49fa9-c5cc-40e7-aff7-24e0b17247cb
--
2fe23bac-4cb2-46a2-827a-8a1c6395e665
1

Now, the last line should not be 1, but rather 2fe... as the line above. The funny thing is, this, as the example shows, only happens to the child object.

Am I completely misunderstanding something here?

share|improve this question
    
I posted a bug report https://github.com/coleifer/peewee/issues/175 on this - the developer recognizes the problem, and will look into it. –  henrikstroem Mar 24 '13 at 16:59
    
It is now fixed - should work in the next release. https://github.com/coleifer/peewee/commit/69a295046ad9f1cfc38d2a1d4b688cfd25b2c‌​65f –  henrikstroem Mar 24 '13 at 20:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have addressed this issue on GitHub and posted a fix. The problem was caused by a bug in the inheritance of primary key fields from model to model.

https://github.com/coleifer/peewee/issues/175

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I'm not a peewee expert, but browsing a couple of samples (example, cookbook), these are classes that define your db schema and implement the database access but are not intended to implement your logic. It should be something like:

#!/usr/bin/python

from peewee import *
import uuid

db = SqliteDatabase('./db/' + str(uuid.uuid4()) + '.db')

class A(Model):
    id = CharField(primary_key=True)
    class Meta:
        database = db

class B(A):
    name = CharField()    

A.create_table()
a = A.create(id=uuid.uuid4())
print a.id
a.save(force_insert=True)
print a.id
print "--"    
B.create_table()
 b = B.create(id=uuid.uuid4(), name='Test')
print b.id
b.save(force_insert=True)
print b.id

Look through the example and cookbook.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, the point of an object-relational-mapper is to let you easily store your model objects in a relational database, but if you can't use the objects for standard OOP stuff, then it kind of ruins the idea, doesn't it? I might be wrong, but I think it would be a terrible limitation. –  henrikstroem Mar 21 '13 at 18:56

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