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prog.cpp:9:13: error: ‘result_type’ does not name a type
prog.cpp:9:13: note: (perhaps ‘typename std::unary_function<_Arg, _Result>::result_type’ was intended)

Compiler: http://ideone.com/vttG8W

Why cannot I use result_type directly?

#include <functional>

using namespace std;

template <typename ARGUEMENT, typename RESULT>
class FunctorBase : public std::unary_function<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>
{
public:
    virtual result_type operator () (argument_type) = 0;
        FunctorBase() {}
        virtual ~FunctorBase() {}
};

int main()
{
    FunctorBase<int&, void>();
}
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marked as duplicate by Praetorian, Peter Wood, NatureFriend, X.L.Ant, pktangyue Mar 22 '13 at 7:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because it is an unqualified name.

When you use unqualified names in a class template, you have to tell the compiler that it should not immediately search for global names during the first phase of the two-phase name lookup, but rather wait until instantiation (because the name could come from a base class, as is the case here).

In this case, you could do this (and make result_type a dependent, qualified name):

typedef typename std::unary_function<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>::result_type result_type;

Notice that the same applies to argument_type.

typedef typename std::unary_function<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>::argument_type argument_type;

Armed with those two typedefs, the original member function declaration will now compile:

virtual result_type operator () (argument_type) = 0;
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Because result_type and argument_type depend on the template parameters. Use:

virtual typename std::unary_function<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>::result_type
  operator () (typename std::unary_function<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>::argument_type) = 0;

or, if you need it in more places, add

using typename std::unary_function<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>::result_type;
using typename std::unary_function<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>::argument_type;

in the beginning of your class.

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You can re-typedef it in your class:

typedef typename std::unary_function<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>::result_type my_result_type;

(You can even rename it the exact same thing) This is can work even if what you inherit from is private.

This compiles:

template <typename blah>
class MyTemplateBaseClass
{
    public: 
    typedef blah my_blah_typedef;
};

template <typename arg>
class DerivedFromTemplated : private MyTemplateBaseClass<arg>
{
public:
    //Either giving the full name:
    typename MyTemplateBaseClass<arg>::my_blah_typedef GetBlahType()
    {
        return typename MyTemplateBaseClass<arg>::my_blah_typedef();
    }

    //Or typedef-ing it locally:
    typedef typename MyTemplateBaseClass<arg>::my_blah_typedef my_blah_typedef;
    my_blah_typedef GetBlahType2()
    {
        return my_blah_typedef();
    }
};

int main()
{
    DerivedFromTemplated<int> test;
}
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1  
The first line says typedef template ... instead of typedef typename .... –  Daniel Frey Mar 21 '13 at 16:32
    
Whoops. The one line I didn't test compile, is the one with a simple mistake. =) Thanks for pointing it out. –  Jamin Grey Mar 21 '13 at 16:37

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