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I'm not using C++11 or Boost. I want to use functors and pass to algorithms such as std::for_each, but I consider it too messy to have to define the functors outside the function. I want to define them locally in the function just before they are used. However, the following does not work. This is due to old C++ Standard, that does NOT allow locally defined classes to be used as template parameter (fixed in C++11).

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v(10);

    class SetInc
    {
    public:
        SetInc() : x(0) {}

        virtual void operator () (int& a)
        {
            a = x++;
        }

    private:
        int x;
    } f;

    std::for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), f);

    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n"));
}

But I've developed the following work around:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <iterator>

template <typename ARGUEMENT, typename RESULT>
class FunctorBase
{
public:
    typedef ARGUEMENT argument_type;
    typedef RESULT result_type;

    virtual result_type operator () (argument_type) = 0;
    FunctorBase() {}
    virtual ~FunctorBase() {}
};

template <typename ARGUEMENT, typename RESULT>
class FunctorWrapper
{
public:
    typedef ARGUEMENT argument_type;
    typedef RESULT result_type;
    typedef FunctorBase<argument_type, result_type> Functor_T;

    explicit FunctorWrapper(Functor_T *functor)
        : functor(functor)
    {}

    result_type operator () (argument_type a)
    {
        return (*functor)(a);
    }

private:
    Functor_T *functor;
};

template <typename ARGUEMENT, typename RESULT>
FunctorWrapper<ARGUEMENT, RESULT> make_unary_functor(FunctorBase<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>& f)
{
    return FunctorWrapper<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>(&f);
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v(10);

    class SetInc : public FunctorBase<int&, void>
    {
    public:
        SetInc() : x(0) {}

        virtual result_type operator () (argument_type a)
        {
            a = x++;
        }

    private:
        int x;
    } f;

    std::for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), make_unary_functor(f));

    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n"));
}

Is that good?

share|improve this question
1  
"However, the following does not work" - how exactly it doesn't work? –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Mar 21 '13 at 17:24
    
IMO, it should work perfectly (judging by looking at the code, but I might have missed something). –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Mar 21 '13 at 17:26
    
Added explanation: This is due to old C++ Standard, that does NOT allow locally defined classes to be used a template parameter (fixed in C++11). –  Neil Kirk Mar 21 '13 at 17:28
    
but I don't see it used as template param, unless you mean in for_each, but that's different usage. just tried in VS2005 - no problems. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Mar 21 '13 at 17:30
    
@ZdeslavVojkovic for_each is a template function and thus SetInc is used as template parameter. –  Torsten Robitzki Mar 21 '13 at 17:32

3 Answers 3

The problem is, that in C++ 98 types without external binding can not be template parameters. So the best you can do is, put your SetInc into an unnamed namespace.

I don't know if you workaround solves the problem in a portable way, but it's even harder to understand (you really need to comment your workaround, to make sure people understand why you did it this way). It's a lot harder for a compiler to optimize the virtual function calls away.

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One clear issue is the virtual function call. With a normal function object the called function can be inlined; with a virtual function, probably not. So you end up with a great deal more overhead for small functions.

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You shouldn't have to define virtual functions -- thre is no polymorphism. All you code is good, but STL is better =)

look here

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/functional/binary_function/

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/functional/unary_function/

at example section

struct IsOdd : public std::unary_function<int,bool> {
  bool operator() (int number) {return (number%2==1);}
};

PS: If you want to use wrapper not to copy functor, rewrite it this way

template

class FunctorWrapper
{
public:
    typedef F::argument_type argument_type;
    typedef F::result_type result_type;

explicit FunctorWrapper(F *functor)
    : functor(functor)
{}

result_type operator () (argument_type const & a) const
{
    return (*functor)(a);
}

result_type operator () (argument_type & a) const
{
    return (*functor)(a);
}

private:
    F *functor;
};

template <typename F>
FunctorWrapper<F> make_unary_functor(F& f)
{
    return FunctorWrapper<ARGUEMENT, RESULT>(&f);
}
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