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I have the following setup:

struct Item { }

class Entry : List<Item> { }

in a generic class, where i pass Entry as type parameter, i am trying to get List<Item>.Count.

i have tried the following already:

var c = typeof(T).GetProperty("Count").GetMethod.Invoke(X, new object[]{}); // x is the variable in the generic class of type T!

i also tried

var c = (x as ICollection).Count;
// throws Cannot cast '((Entry)X)' (which has an actual type of 'Entry') to 'System.Collections.Generic.List<Item>'

now i really have no idea how to get the Count :(

Code for the generic class: The idea is to have a field which remembers a specific starting value and then gives feedback if it has been changed.

SyncField<T>
{
    T O { get; private set; }
    T V { get; private set; }

    public bool HasChanged
    {
        get
        {
            if (V != null && O != null)
            {
                var func = typeof(T).GetProperty("Count");
                if (func != null)
                {
                    var oc = func.GetMethod.Invoke(O, new object[] { });
                    var vc = func.GetMethod.Invoke(V, new object[] { });
                    return oc != vc; // here i am trying to simply do ICollection.Count != ICollection.Count
                }
            }
            return O != null && !O.Equals(V);
        }
    }

}

Update: I settled for this:

public bool HasChanged
{
    get { return return O != null && !O.Equals(V); }
}

Why? because the Equals() Method of List<T> already does what i need to tell me if those 2 are different :)

share|improve this question
3  
Why are you using reflection in the first place? If the item is an Entry or any subtype of it then you can just call Count on it and be done. –  Servy Mar 21 '13 at 17:49
    
Design pattern: Favor object composition over class inheritance, why would you derive from it, instead of include a list as a member? –  David Mar 21 '13 at 17:50
2  
Please show a short but complete example demonstrating the problem. (And then consider redesigning, as suggested.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 21 '13 at 17:51
1  
you need to tell the compiler that T is an Enumerable type by using a where clause. Then stop using reflection –  pm100 Mar 21 '13 at 17:58
    
@pm100 the idea for the class is to work with every type, and if its a IColecction then it shall check the count for it –  Nefarion Mar 21 '13 at 18:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume you're doing SyncField<Entity> elsewhere.

SyncField<T>
{
    T O { get; private set; }
    T V { get; private set; }

    public bool HasChanged
    {
        get
        {
            if (V != null && O != null && O is ICollection)
            {
                return ((ICollection)O).Count != ((ICollection)V).Count;
            }
            else
            {
                return O != null && !O.Equals(V);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are assuming right :) and funny that that works, because it won't work with as ICollection. Thanks! –  Nefarion Mar 21 '13 at 19:20
    
@Nefarion - I'm glad it helped. return (O as ICollection).Count != (V as ICollection).Count works just fine for me, though. –  Bobson Mar 21 '13 at 20:25

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