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try {
   // Do stuff
}
catch (Exception e) {
   throw;
}
finally {
   // Clean up
}

In the above block when is the finally block called? Before the throwing of e or is finally called and then catch?

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3  
p.s. you should not "throw e;" because that will mess up the stack trace of the original exception. You should just "throw;". Or create a new exception and set the InnerException to "e" before you throw it. –  Erv Walter Oct 12 '09 at 16:42
10  
finally would be a pretty poor choice of keyword if it didn't run last, wouldn't you say? –  Eric Lippert Oct 12 '09 at 18:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 33 down vote accepted

it would be called after e is re-thrown (i.e. after the catch block is executed)

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6  
and never if you call Envrionment.FailFast() –  Johannes Rudolph Oct 12 '09 at 17:22

Your example would behave identically to this code:

try {
    try {
        // Do stuff
    } catch(Exception e) {
        throw e;
    }
} finally {
    // Clean up
}

As a side note, if you really mean throw e; (that is, throw the same exception you just caught), it is much better to just do throw;, since that will preserve the original stack trace instead of creating a new one.

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8  
+1 for throw; vs throw e;. This concept is missed a LOT. –  snicker Oct 12 '09 at 16:41
    
I don't not think this is correct. Finally should be inside the outer try block not outside it –  Matthew Pigram Feb 6 '14 at 2:41
    
@MatthewPigram: What do you mean? The finally block will in fact run after the catch block (even if the catch block rethrows the exception), which is what my snippet is trying to illustrate. –  Daniel Pryden Feb 6 '14 at 8:07
    
from how I interpret his example he is attempting to do a try catch finally within another try block. NOT a try catch within a try catch finally –  Matthew Pigram Feb 6 '14 at 23:07
1  
@MatthewPigram: My answer doesn't have any "try-catch-finally" construct at all. It has a "try-finally", and inside the try block of that my answer has a "try-catch". I'm trying to explain the behavior of the 3-part construct by using two 2-part constructs. I don't see any sign of a second try block in the original question, so I don't understand where you're getting that. –  Daniel Pryden Feb 7 '14 at 7:32

Why not try it:

outer try
inner try
inner catch
inner finally
outer catch
outer finally

with code (formatted for vertical space):

static void Main() {
    try {
        Console.WriteLine("outer try");
        DoIt();
    } catch {
        Console.WriteLine("outer catch");
        // swallow
    } finally {
        Console.WriteLine("outer finally");
    }
}
static void DoIt() {
    try {
        Console.WriteLine("inner try");
        int i = 0;
        Console.WriteLine(12 / i); // oops
    } catch (Exception e) {
        Console.WriteLine("inner catch");
        throw e; // or "throw", or "throw anything"
    } finally {
        Console.WriteLine("inner finally");
    }
}
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3  
+1, for something so simple, you should really just try it like Marc has. GJ illustrating it with nested try/catch/finally :) –  Allen Rice Oct 12 '09 at 17:05

A simple way to tell also is to debug your code and notice when finally is called.

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Testing with a C# Console Application, the finally code has been executed after the exception is thrown: The "Application Error Dialog" existed and after you chose "Close the program" option, the finally block was executed in that console window. But setting the breaking point inside the finally code block, I can never hit it. The debugger keeps stopping at the throw statement. Here is my test code:

    class Program
    {
       static void Main(string[] args)
       {
          string msg;
          Console.WriteLine(string.Format("GetRandomNuber returned: {0}{1}", GetRandomNumber(out msg), msg) == "" ? "" : "An error has occurred: " + msg);
       }

       static int GetRandomNumber(out string errorMessage)
       {
         int result = 0;
         try
         {
            errorMessage = "";
            int test = 0;
            result = 3/test;
            return result;
         }
         catch (Exception ex)
         {
            errorMessage = ex.Message;
            throw ex;

         }
         finally
         {
            Console.WriteLine("finally block!");
         }

       }
    }

Debugging in VS2010 - .NET Framework 4.0

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If there is an unhandled exception inside a catch handler block, the finally block gets called exactly zero times

  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
     try
     {
        Console.WriteLine("in the try");
        int d = 0;
        int k = 0 / d;
     }
     catch (Exception e)
     {
        Console.WriteLine("in the catch");
        throw;
     }
     finally
     {
        Console.WriteLine("In the finally");
     }
  }

Output:

C:\users\administrator\documents\TestExceptionNesting\bin\Release>TestExceptionNesting.exe

in the try

in the catch

Unhandled Exception: System.DivideByZeroException: Attempted to divide by zero. at TestExceptionNesting.Program.Main(String[] args) in C:\users\administrator\documents\TestExceptionNesting\TestExceptionNesting.cs:line 22

C:\users\administrator\documents\TestExceptionNesting\bin\release>

I got asked this question today at an interview and the interviewer kept going back "are you sure the finally doesn't get called?" I was uncertain if it was meant a trick question or the interviewer had something else in mind and wrote the wrong code for me to debug so I came home and tried it (build and run, no debugger interaction), just to put my mind at rest.

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