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So I'm using C# 3.0, and I'm trying to accomplish some specific form of event routing.

public class A
{ 
  public delegate void FooDel(string blah);
  public Event FooDel FooHandler;

  //...some code that eventually raises FooHandler event
}

public class B
{
  public A a = new A(); 

  //...some code that calls functions on "a" that might cause
  //FooHandler event to be raised
}

public class C
{
  private List<B> MyListofBs = new List<B>();

  //...code that causes instances of B to be added to the list
  //and calls functions on those B instances that might get A.FooHandler raised

  public Event A.FooDel FooHandler;
}

What I'm trying to figure out is how to route all A.FooHandler event firings of instances of A to the one event C.FooHandler. So that if someone registers to C.FooHandler they would really be getting events raised by any of the instances of A contained by instances of B in the list.

How would I accomplish this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With the example code you have provided, you cannot do what you want. Since you have made A private within B, you are sealing off access to the A instance from any code outside of the B class (which includes the C class).

You must somehow make your A instance publicly accessible so that the methods within C can access it through B in order to subscribe and de-subscribe to the event contained within A.


Edit: Assuming B.a was public, the easiest thing to do since C.MyListofBs is private, is to create your own Add/Remove methods which also subscribe and de-subscribe to the event you want within A, like so.

I also took the liberty of removing your delegate in favor of the much cleaner Action class.

public class A
{ 
    public Event Action<string> FooHandler;

    //...some code that eventually raises FooHandler event
}

public class B
{
    public A a = new A();

    //...some code that calls functions on "a" that might cause
    //FooHandler event to be raised
}

public class C
{
    private List<B> MyListofBs = new List<B>();

    //...code that causes instances of B to be added to the list
    //and calls functions on those B instances that might get A.FooHandler raised

    public void Add(B item)
    {
        MyListofBs.Add(item);
        item.a.FooHandler += EventAction;
    }

    public void Remove(B item)
    {
        item.a.FooHandler -= EventAction;
        MyListofBs.Remove(item);
    }

    private void EventAction(string s)
    {
        // This is invoked when "A.FooHandler" is raised for any 
        // item inside the MyListofBs collection.
    }
}

Edit: And if you want a relay event in C, do this:

public class C
{
    private List<B> MyListofBs = new List<B>();

    public event Action<string> RelayEvent;

    //...code that causes instances of B to be added to the list
    //and calls functions on those B instances that might get A.FooHandler raised

    public void Add(B item)
    {
        MyListofBs.Add(item);
        item.a.FooHandler += EventAction;
    }

    public void Remove(B item)
    {
        item.a.FooHandler -= EventAction;
        MyListofBs.Remove(item);
    }

    private void EventAction(string s)
    {
        if(RelayEvent != null)
        {
            RelayEvent(s);
        }
    }
}
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Ok say "a" in B was public. –  Ryan Mar 21 '13 at 19:11
    
See my edit above. –  SpikeX Mar 21 '13 at 19:17
    
But now there is no event in C i can subscribe to, which is my aim. –  Ryan Mar 21 '13 at 19:29
    
It's simple, just add the event and invoke it. See my latest edit. –  SpikeX Mar 21 '13 at 19:31
1  
If you're feeling adventurous you could decompile some of the WPF libraries and figure out how Microsoft handles its tunneling/bubbling routed events. –  SpikeX Mar 21 '13 at 19:53

Subscribe to your B.foohandler events

Foreach(var item in MyListofBs) 
{

      Item.fooHandler += new EventHandler(CEventHandler) 
}
   //each time your Events are called you reroute it with C.EventHandler 
Private CEventHandler(string blah) 
{    
    If(FooHanler!=null)
       FooHanler(); 
}

Go over the following example Events Tutorial

share|improve this answer
    
Where would this foreach go? Does that happen after all Bs are added to the list in C? What is EventHandler, where is that defined? –  Ryan Mar 21 '13 at 19:18
    
Yes you subscribe either after all the list is created or after each item is added –  makc Mar 21 '13 at 19:26
    
Sorry misread EventHandler, ive use that before. –  Ryan Mar 21 '13 at 19:40

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