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[Solved: Look at edit 2] The following query takes 37 seconds to finish (This query gets the 50th post a user has made and the corresponding creation date)

SELECT p.id, 
       (SELECT id 
        FROM   posts 
        WHERE  owneruserid = p.id 
        ORDER  BY creationdate 
        LIMIT  49, 1) AS post50id, 
       (SELECT creationdate 
        FROM   posts 
        WHERE  id = post50id) 
FROM   prol_users p 
WHERE  postcount >= 50 

whereas the following takes 30 minutes to finish (5th post)

SELECT p.id, 
       (SELECT id 
        FROM   posts 
        WHERE  owneruserid = p.id 
        ORDER  BY creationdate 
        LIMIT  4, 1) AS post5id, 
       (SELECT creationdate 
        FROM   posts 
        WHERE  id = post5id) 
FROM   prol_users p 
WHERE  postcount >= 50 

Please notice that it is the first time I'm running the queries, so there's no caching involved. The only difference between the first query and 2nd is limit 49, 1 vs limit 4, 1

Is there any reason why it takes lesser time when the query is limited to 50 rows than when it is limited to 5 rows?


Explain output:

--Note: The faster one, limit 50
mysql> explain select p.id, (select id from posts where owneruserid = p.id order by creationdate limit 49,1) as post50id, (select creationdate from posts where id = post50id) from prol_users p where postcount >= 50;
+----+--------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------+-----------------+---------+------------+--------+-----------------------------+
| id | select_type        | table | type   | possible_keys            | key             | key_len | ref        | rows   | Extra                       |
+----+--------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------+-----------------+---------+------------+--------+-----------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY            | p     | ALL    | NULL                     | NULL            | NULL    | NULL       | 199026 | Using where                 |
|  3 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | posts | eq_ref | PRIMARY                  | PRIMARY         | 4       | func       |      1 | Using where                 |
|  2 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | posts | ref    | idx_owneruserid,idx_ouid | idx_owneruserid | 5       | jagat.p.id |     11 | Using where; Using filesort |
+----+--------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------+-----------------+---------+------------+--------+-----------------------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

--Note: The slower one, limit 5
mysql> explain select p.id, (select id from posts where owneruserid = p.id order by creationdate limit 4,1) as post5id, (select creationdate from posts where id = post5id) from prol_users p where postcount >= 50;
+----+--------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------+------------------+---------+------+--------+-------------+
| id | select_type        | table | type   | possible_keys            | key              | key_len | ref  | rows   | Extra       |
+----+--------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------+------------------+---------+------+--------+-------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY            | p     | ALL    | NULL                     | NULL             | NULL    | NULL | 199026 | Using where |
|  3 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | posts | eq_ref | PRIMARY                  | PRIMARY          | 4       | func |      1 | Using where |
|  2 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | posts | index  | idx_owneruserid,idx_ouid | idx_creationdate | 8       | NULL |      5 | Using where |
+----+--------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------+------------------+---------+------+--------+-------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Edit: I tested with various limit values and noticed that performance improves drastically when limit is changed from 9,1 to 10,1. In fact, the explain plan changes as well (to that of 50). Any insight on why it does so? Also, I added an index posts(creationdate, owneruserid) and there's no visible difference in performance.

Edit2: Finally got it working by using force index (idx_owneruserid) on the 1st subquery. Lesson learnt: When explain plan doesn't use your indices as expected, use force index.

share|improve this question
4  
What does EXPLAIN say about the two queries? –  cdhowie Mar 21 '13 at 18:58
    
Here's the explain output pastebin.com/raw.php?i=UQGbj0NY –  Jagat Mar 21 '13 at 19:07
2  
Please put that kind of information in the question itself, not on an external site. I've done so for you. –  cdhowie Mar 21 '13 at 19:08
    
What indexes do you have on this table? I see that a different index is used in each query. If you don't have an index (owneruserid, creationdate) then consider creating one, as it has the potential to dramatically improve the performance of both queries. –  cdhowie Mar 21 '13 at 19:11
    
Thanks. Please let me know if you need more information. I didn't understand why one would take lesser time even though it involves a filesort and 11 rows for subquery vs 5 rows for the other query. –  Jagat Mar 21 '13 at 19:12

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