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so, this is about at the limits of my technical understanding, so please be kind about any gross errors.

There are lots of articles on the web about how to give UDP some of the various great features of TCP. I have the opposite question: how much of TCP can be stripped away or deactivated to make it act like UDP?

This line of thought came from reading about how you can turn off Nagle's algorithm. I thought, gee, what else could you turn off?

For instance, can you turn off the requirement for guaranteed packet ordering?

Can you turn off the requirement for back-and-forth communication to verify a connection?

Would it make TCP act more like UDP if you only ever sent really small discrete packets and did all the ordering/reordering stuff yourself on the other end?

A reason one might want to do this is to simulate UDP over mobile networks, which tend to only reliably support TCP.

Any help or suggestions greatly appreciated.

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For instance, can you turn off the requirement for guaranteed packet ordering?

No. It is possible to set the counter up. Than is not each packet confirmed but a paket loose will also be detected.

Can you turn off the requirement for back-and-forth communication to verify a connection?

You can set the time up to 2 minutes but not higher.

Would it make TCP act more like UDP if you only ever sent really small discrete packets and did all the ordering/reordering stuff yourself on the other end?

If you use for each message a new connection you will have a lord of overhead.

But all this operation are deep in the IP/TCP stack and not easy to configure.

A reason one might want to do this is to simulate UDP over mobile networks, which tend to only reliably support TCP.

You can use a VPN. So you have a TCP connection over the air and a UDP connection to your server but you will have the same latency. Wireless connection are know about the packet lost. It is not a realy good idea to use UDP and mobile phone networks lose much more then wlan.

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