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I am creating simple GUI system based on blender's GHOST system, which I think in this question is not very important. GHOST itself has simple event system.

My event system should be flexible, allow some sort of implementation of MVC pattern, smart memory deallocation, should work cross-platform, should be written in c++0x

Folowing example shows inherited method from GHOST which processes events.

bool Application::processEvent(GHOST_IEvent *event)
{
    GHOST_IWindow *window = event->getWindow();
    bool handled = true;

    switch (event->getType()) {

        case GHOST_kEventWheel:
        {
            mouseDriver->handleWheel((GHOST_TEventWheelData *) event->getData());
        }
        break;  
        case GHOST_kEventButtonDown:
        {
            mouseDriver->handleButtonDown((GHOST_TEventButtonData *) event->getData());
        }
        break;  
        case GHOST_kEventButtonUp:
        {
            mouseDriver->handleButtonUp((GHOST_TEventButtonData *) event->getData());
        }
        break;

        case GHOST_kEventCursorMove:
        {
              mouseDriver->handleCursorMove((GHOST_TEventCursorData *) event->getData());
        } 
        break;

        case GHOST_kEventKeyUp:
        {
            keyDriver->handleKeyUp((GHOST_TEventKeyData *) event->getData());       
        }
        break;
        case GHOST_kEventKeyDown:
        {
            keyDriver->handleKeyDown((GHOST_TEventKeyData *) event->getData()); 
        }
        break;
    }
    return true;//currently not used while experimenting`
}

I have written two classes KeyDriver and MouseDriver which should handle GHOST events and notify those who are interested in events. Now the real question is what would be best practice to implement further event distribution from driver classes, I have read several articles and solutions how event systems work like http://accu.org/index.php/journals/464 or C++ event system design but I don't know which to choose and why one is better than other.

I have thought of doing it like Swing in java have. Where listener class is created and registered to listen to component events, and listener class must inherit from some class.

Why would this method worse than with functors, where callback functions are used? Which implementation would you choose and why?

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1 Answer

I use Boost.Signals2 (which was the accepted answer for that StackOverflow question you've already referenced). I started using this when I was first learning Boost libraries three or four years ago, and it proved to be simple, flexible, elegant, and reliable; I've had no reason to look for another solution.

It's been quite some time since I've used Swing, so I can't really comment in depth. Using Signals2, you still "create" a "listener class" (by defining a signal type; the listener is the resultant slot type); and you "register" a listener to a given signal instance via the connect() method.

With Signals2, each signal can accept multiple parameters, and if desired return a result to the signaler. There is a lot of flexibility in connection maintenance.

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Thank you, boost::signals2 was one of the best solutions I have found too. –  insanebits Mar 21 '13 at 23:23
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