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First, for the short version:

Isn't a method definition just a block? Why can't I do something like:

obj.instance_exec(&other_obj.method(:my_method))

with the goal of running some module method in the context of an instance of a separate class? The method is called, but it doesn't seem to be executed in the context of 'obj', despite the 'instance_exec' call.

The only way I can figure out how to accomplish this is to wrap all of the code of 'my_method' in a proc, then call in the following manner instead:

obj.instance_eval(&other_obj.my_method)

but I'd like to avoid encapsulating all of my module methods in procs.


Now, for the long version:

I'm attempting to create a modularized external provider system, where for any given class/method (generally controller methods,) I can call a corresponding method for a given provider (e.g. facebook).

Since there could be multiple providers, the provider methods need to be namespaced, but instead of simply including a bunch of methods like, for example, 'facebook_invitation_create', I'd like my InvitationsController instance to have a facebook member containing a create method - e.g.

class InvitationsController < ApplicationController
  def create
    ...
    # e.g. self.facebook.create
    self.send(params[:provider]).create
    ...
  end
end

Furthermore, I'd like the provider methods to not only function as if they were part of the controller itself - meaning they should have access to things like controller instance variables, params, session, etc. - but also to be (mostly) written as if they were part of the controller itself - meaning without any complex additional code as a result of being modularized.

I've created a simplified example below, in which MyClass has a greet method, which if called with a valid provider name (:facebook in this case), will call that providers greet method instead. In turn, the provider greet method accesses the message method of the including class, as if it were part of the class itself.

module Providers
  def facebook
    @facebook ||= FacebookProvider
  end

  module FacebookProvider
    class << self
      def greet
        proc {
          "#{message} from facebook!"
        }
      end
    end
  end
end

class MyClass
  include Providers
  attr_accessor :message

  def initialize(message="hello")
    self.message = message
  end

  def greet(provider=nil)
    (provider.nil? or !self.respond_to?(provider)) ? message : instance_exec(&self.send(provider).greet)
  end
end

This actually accomplishes almost everything I've previously stated, but I'm hung up on the fact that my provider functions need to be encapsulated in procs. I thought maybe I could simply call instance_exec on the method instead (after removing the proc encapsulation):

instance_exec(&self.send(provider).method(:greet))

...but then it seems like the instance_exec is ignored, as I get the error:

NameError: undefined local variable or method `message' for Providers::FacebookProvider:Module

Is there any way to call instance_exec on a defined method?

(I'm open to suggestions on how to better implement this as well...)

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Maybe I'm not following along, but it seems like you are making this harder than it needs to be.

Why not implement a "dispatch" pattern in your class, where you have a hash of provider names and provider methods {:facebook=>"facebook_greet"} and then just "send" the incoming call to the correct handler via "Object#send" (http://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Object.html#method-i-send)? Send is very fast for dispatching methods, so unlike eval, you should get great performance.

Here's some code to demonstrate the way I'd solve it (assuming I am following along with what you're trying to accomplish):

module TwitterProvider
  def providerInit(providers)
    @providers[:twitter]="twitter_greet"
    super(providers) if defined?(super)
  end
  def twitter_greet
    "Hello Twitter User"
  end
end

module FacebookProvider
  def providerInit(providers)
    providers[:facebook]="facebook_greet"
    super(providers) if defined?(super)
  end
  def facebook_greet
    "Hello Facebook User"
  end
end


class MyClass
  include FacebookProvider
  include TwitterProvider
  attr_accessor :message

  def providerInit(providers)
    super(providers) if defined?(super)
  end

  def initialize(message="hello")
    @providers = {}
    self.message = message
    providerInit(@providers)
  end

  def greet(provider=nil)
    if provider.nil? or !self.respond_to?(@providers[provider])
      self.message
    else
      self.send(@providers[provider])
    end
  end
end

my_class = MyClass.new
puts my_class.greet
puts my_class.greet(:twitter)
puts my_class.greet(:facebook)

# Output:
# hello
# Hello Twitter User
# Hello Facebook User
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the input (wish I had seen it sooner...) I think you get the gist of what I'm trying to do, but with one missing detail... I wanted the provider modules to be collections of methods which apply to the object in which they're included, so I can't just call self.send(provider), but need something like self.send(provider).method. I could just do something like self.send("#{provider}_#{method}"), but was trying to avoid namespacing every function in my modules w/ the module name itself... –  Ryan Dugan Dec 21 '13 at 10:39

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