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Given that generic types create separate instances of static fields per-type combination, is this a valid pattern to use if I want to have a static field across all types?

public class BaseClass
{
    public static int P = 0;
}

public class ChildClass<T> : BaseClass
{
    public static int Q = 0;

    public void Inc()
    {
        // ChildClass<int> will have a different "Q" than ChildClass<double> 
        Interlocked.Increment(ref Q); 
        // all types of ChildClass will increment the same P
        Interlocked.Increment(ref P); 
    }
}

Is there anything unsafe about this approach? My toy example works, but I just wanted to make sure there are no horrible side effects, threading consequences, etc :)

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3  
Only real unsafe part about it is the incrementation (as it is now) which will not be threadsafe. EDIT: Also, I'm assuming you'd want to control get/set access (do you want it to be publically settable, or only increment privately within the Inc method?) –  Chris Sinclair Mar 21 '13 at 23:53
    
Haha good point. I have to be less careless with my example. Assume Interlocked something or other please –  Ismail Degani Mar 21 '13 at 23:56
    
The actual problem I'm dealing with is that I want a single threadsafe queue, but the class that adds things to this internal queue is generic. So the "value" will not be publicly settable. –  Ismail Degani Mar 21 '13 at 23:58
2  
Then yeah, no real issues I think. Just remember that <T> will be unique for any particular subclass or interface used. So ChildClass<Stream> will have a different Q than ChildClass<MemoryStream>, same with ChildClass<IEnumerable> and ChildClass<ArrayList>. –  Chris Sinclair Mar 21 '13 at 23:59
1  
I guess specifically about your question, no, there are no terrible side effects about this. So long as you understand about uniqueness of Q with respect to T, then it's perfectly valid to take advantage of static members within generic classes like this. Probably the most significant is if you were to create a locking object on ChildClass<T> (like private static object LockingObject = new Object()) you need to recognize that the lock will not be shared between different concrete ChildClass<T> types. If you need a shared lock, you need to define the object on BaseClass. –  Chris Sinclair Mar 22 '13 at 0:10

2 Answers 2

You can use Interlocked.Increment for more thread-safe code.

public void Inc()
{
    Interlocked.Increment(ref Q); // ChildClass<int> will have a different "Q" than ChildClass<double> 
    Interlocked.Increment(ref P); // all types of ChildClass will increment the same P
}

or plain old lock

public class BaseClass
{
    protected static int P = 0;
    protected static object pLock = new object();
}

public class ChildClass<T> : BaseClass
{
    private static int Q = 0;
    private static object qLock = new object();

    public void Inc()
    {
        lock(qLock)
        {
            qLock++;
        }

        lock(pLock)
        {
            qLock++;
        }
    }
}

Note that for every T there will be a different ChildClass<T>.Q, but there shall only ever be one BaseClass.P. That means you'd have to use separate lock objects for dealing with Q and P (technically anything you use to lock P can also be used to lock all Q's but that's probably not what you want to do).

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Thanks for the answer, but the question was more about the inheritance / singularity of the static field, not really anything to do with the actual incrementing of an int. I'll update my question with your interlocked code. –  Ismail Degani Mar 22 '13 at 0:01

Your pattern is valid and has no issues. There is no such thing as static inheritance, but you can access the static members of any type just like you normally would (provided they are visible to your derived class, e.g. not private):

BaseClass.P = 10;
ChildClass<string>.Q = 20;

The C# specification states that single reads or writes to 32-bit integers (i.e. int) are atomic, which means they can complete within a single instruction and never will a half-written variable be visible to another thread.

12.5 Atomicity of variable references

Reads and writes of the following data types shall be atomic: bool, char, byte, sbyte, short, ushort, uint, int, float, and reference types. In addition, reads and writes of enum types with an underlying type in the previous list shall also be atomic. Reads and writes of other types, including long, ulong, double, and decimal, as well as user-defined types, need not be atomic.

Of course, reading and writing is not guaranteed to be atomic. For example, incrementing a variable's value requires it to be read then written, and that's where the Interlocked methods come into play.

By the way, you are probably aware that you'll get only one P static variable, but as many Q static variables as there are different generic instances of your type ChildClass<T>.

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