Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this example

    public interface IAnimal
    {
        [Obsolete("Animals can't eat anymore", true)]
        void Eat();
    }

    public class Animal : IAnimal
    {
        public void Eat()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello");
        }
    }

I have an interface IAnimal with an obsoleted method. The Class Animal implements that interface.

Later on, i call the Eat method as such:

var animal = new Animal();
animal.Eat();

The compiler does not fail to compile (i have Obsolete marked to give an error instead of an warning). The program compiles and the method is invoked with no errors, as well.

As far as i can see this is a bug from the compiler. Am i missing anything?

Note: i am using VS2010

share|improve this question
    
This is not a compiler bug. –  Eric Lippert Mar 22 '13 at 5:12
    
@EricLippert: if i had marked obsolete as warning shouldn't the compiler provide a warning to whoever implements it? I understand marking obsolete to give an error can be a corner case –  Luis Filipe Mar 22 '13 at 9:35
2  
That's not a compiler bug either. You didn't mark Animal.Eat obsolete, you marked IAnimal.Eat obsolete. You used Animal.Eat, which might not be obsolete. –  Eric Lippert Mar 22 '13 at 14:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You've only marked IAnimal.Eat as obsolete, not Animal.Eat. The var keyword resolves to Animal, and so when you call animal.Eat, you're not calling into any method marked as Obsolete.

To fix, either explicitly change var to IAnimal, or better still, mark Animal.Eat as obsolete as well:

    public interface IAnimal
    {
        [Obsolete("Animals can't eat anymore", true)]
        void Eat();
    }

    public class Animal : IAnimal
    {
        [Obsolete("Animals can't eat anymore", true)]
        public void Eat()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

It looks like the behavior is because your var animal is an Animal in which the Eat method is not obsolete. If you did:

IAnimal animal = new Animal();
animal.Eat();

you should see the warning/error that you expect.

share|improve this answer

The compiler won't warn for obsolete methods from interfaces, only for method calls. There are good reasons for this:

You may always name your method Eat

You are always allowed to implement a method Eat on Animal regardless of whether it is also present in one of the interfaces and marked obsolete. For example, if this is allowed:

public class Animal
{
    public void Eat() { /* ... */ }
}

Why wouldn't this be allowed:

public class Animal : IAnimal
{
    public void Eat() { /* ... */ }
}

All interface methods must be implemented

You are required to implement all methods present in an interface. You can't skip any of them, not even when they are obsolete.

For example, if you didn't add Eat, you wouldn't have implemented all members of the interface and you'd get other errors:

public class Animal : IAnimal
{
    // No Eat()
}

'Animal' does not implement interface member 'IAnimal.Eat()'

share|improve this answer
1  
The second reason is the big one. The author of an interface may wish to discourage people from using a particular method, but the system's going to insist that every class that claims to implement an interface must implement every member whether or not anyone uses it. –  supercat Nov 13 '13 at 20:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.