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Slackware here. I was just messing around with memory stuff and pointers... I wanted to learn a bit more about those, so I made an array in c++, and looked up the memory address of the first item in it...:

string foo[3] = {"a", "b", "c"};
cout << *(&foo[0]-4) << endl;

It outputted this: http://pastebin.com/K0HAL5nJ The whole code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string foo[3] = {"a", "b", "c"};
    cout << &foo[0] << " minus " << &foo[1] << " equals " << int(&foo[0])-int(&foo[1]) << endl;
    cout << *(&foo[0]-4) << endl;
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;
    return 0;
}

I am a complete beginner in c++ and do not understand why this happens at all... I know that this sort of code is not supposed to... be, but still, could anyone please explain what happened there?

share|improve this question
1  
What do you think should happen? – chris Mar 22 '13 at 0:41
1  
Could you post the relevant code/output here, rather than via a link. Thanks. – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 22 '13 at 0:42
    
Isn't this similiar to the old printf("%s%s%s%s%s");? – Christian Ivicevic Mar 22 '13 at 0:44
up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's undefined behaviour. &foo[0] gives you the address of the first std::string object, which you then subtract 4 from. From §5.7 Additive operators:

If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

Undefined behaviour means you could experience anything. What is probably happening is some area of memory, four positions before the beginning of the array, that is not a valid std::string object is being treated as a std::string. This is bound to lead to ugly things happening.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer! I was also wondering, is it possible to find out exactly what was in that byte? – Slackware Mar 22 '13 at 0:47
    
What's in there is undefined and non-deterministic. Even if you find out what is there, it won't necessarily be there on another platform or if you use another compiler. – John Humphreys - w00te Mar 22 '13 at 0:51

You are accessing some memory that is out of the address space of the array you allocated, which results in undefined behavior.

 string foo[3] = {"a", "b", "c"};
 cout << &foo[0] << " minus " << &foo[1] << " equals " 
      << int(&foo[0])-int(&foo[1]);

 &foo[0] get the memory address of "a",
 &foo[1] get the memory address of "b";
 the output is OK since both address are in range of foo's address space

cout << *(&foo[0]-4) << endl;
 You tried to get the value at address of ("a" -4),
since this address is outside the address of foo, it is undefined behavior. 
share|improve this answer
    
I understand the fact that it's undefined behavior, but why THIS output exactly? I tried with +3 and +4 and it gave other kinds of weird outputs, even sound sometimes... – Slackware Mar 22 '13 at 0:56
1  
@Slackware Since the behavior is undefined, therefore, sometimes it may output garbage, sometimes it may output something that seems right but actually wrong – taocp Mar 22 '13 at 0:58
  cout << *(&foo[0]-4) << endl;

this code is to print foo[-4]

try this code.

 cout << *(&foo[4]-4) << endl;

this will print foo[0]

 T * p;
 int n;

p+n means that the address of p add sizeof(T *)*n

Pointer addition and element size
When you add an integer to a pointer, the integer is multiplied by the element size of the type that the pointer points to.

// Assume sizeof(int) is 4.
int b[100];  // b is an array of 100 ints.
int* p;      // p is a a pointer to an int.
p = b;       // Assigns address of first element of b. Ie, &b[0]
p = p + 1;   // Adds 4 to p (4 == 1 * sizeof(int)). Ie, &b[1]
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed! But this is strange, because &foo[0]-&foo[4] equals -16, not -4 – Slackware Mar 22 '13 at 0:55
    
Well, I assumed pexeer was talking about an array with a length of 5, and his affirmation was correct in that case. – Slackware Mar 22 '13 at 0:58
1  
&foo[0] + 1 means foo+1 and means &foo[1] – pexeer Mar 22 '13 at 1:04
1  
&foo[0] -4 means the address of foo[0] - 4*sizeof(string *) – pexeer Mar 22 '13 at 1:12

Pointer addition and element size


When you add an integer to a pointer, the integer is multiplied by the element size of the type that the pointer points to.

// Assume sizeof(int) is 4.
int b[100];  // b is an array of 100 ints.
int* p;      // p is a a pointer to an int.
p = b;       // Assigns address of first element of b. Ie, &b[0]
p = p + 1;   // Adds 4 to p (4 == 1 * sizeof(int)). Ie, &b[1]

http://www.fredosaurus.com/notes-cpp/arrayptr/26arraysaspointers.html

share|improve this answer
    
Wow thanks for the info that removes quite a lot of confusion with array memory allocation – Slackware Mar 23 '13 at 1:23

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