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I know FILE is a typedef-ed struct, but where can I look up the actual definition of struct FILE using man page?

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look into /usr/include/libio.h for struct _IO_FILE –  perreal Mar 22 '13 at 1:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you start at /usr/include/stdio.h, you would find this line:

typedef struct _IO_FILE FILE;

Just grepping for __IO_FILE in /usr/include reveals that the struct is defined in /usr/include/libio.h

My /usr/include/libio.h shows the following definition for __IO_FILE:

struct _IO_FILE {
  int _flags;       /* High-order word is _IO_MAGIC; rest is flags. */
#define _IO_file_flags _flags

  /* The following pointers correspond to the C++ streambuf protocol. */
  /* Note:  Tk uses the _IO_read_ptr and _IO_read_end fields directly. */
  char* _IO_read_ptr;   /* Current read pointer */
  char* _IO_read_end;   /* End of get area. */
  char* _IO_read_base;  /* Start of putback+get area. */
  char* _IO_write_base; /* Start of put area. */
  char* _IO_write_ptr;  /* Current put pointer. */
  char* _IO_write_end;  /* End of put area. */
  char* _IO_buf_base;   /* Start of reserve area. */
  char* _IO_buf_end;    /* End of reserve area. */
  /* The following fields are used to support backing up and undo. */
  char *_IO_save_base; /* Pointer to start of non-current get area. */
  char *_IO_backup_base;  /* Pointer to first valid character of backup area */
  char *_IO_save_end; /* Pointer to end of non-current get area. */

  struct _IO_marker *_markers;

  struct _IO_FILE *_chain;

  int _fileno;
#if 0
  int _blksize;
#else
  int _flags2;
#endif
  _IO_off_t _old_offset; /* This used to be _offset but it's too small.  */

#define __HAVE_COLUMN /* temporary */
  /* 1+column number of pbase(); 0 is unknown. */
  unsigned short _cur_column;
  signed char _vtable_offset;
  char _shortbuf[1];

  /*  char* _save_gptr;  char* _save_egptr; */

  _IO_lock_t *_lock;
#ifdef _IO_USE_OLD_IO_FILE
};

struct _IO_FILE_complete
{
  struct _IO_FILE _file;
#endif
#if defined _G_IO_IO_FILE_VERSION && _G_IO_IO_FILE_VERSION == 0x20001
  _IO_off64_t _offset;
# if defined _LIBC || defined _GLIBCPP_USE_WCHAR_T
  /* Wide character stream stuff.  */
  struct _IO_codecvt *_codecvt;
  struct _IO_wide_data *_wide_data;
  struct _IO_FILE *_freeres_list;
  void *_freeres_buf;
  size_t _freeres_size;
# else
  void *__pad1;
  void *__pad2;
  void *__pad3;
  void *__pad4;
  size_t __pad5;
# endif
  int _mode;
  /* Make sure we don't get into trouble again.  */
  char _unused2[15 * sizeof (int) - 4 * sizeof (void *) - sizeof (size_t)];
#endif
};
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4  
Good answer, but I'd like to add that FILE is what's known as an opaque type. You are not intended to look at its definition; it's for the internal use of the C standard library, and no other code should be looking at its insides. The details will vary widely across platforms and releases. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Mar 22 '13 at 1:46
    
@ErnestFriedman-Hill I like your explication for opaque type. –  SIFE Mar 22 '13 at 1:52

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