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main.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.14;
use ReadData;

my $read = ReadData->new();
my @name = $read->getNames();
$read->printNames(@name);

ReadData.pm:

#!/usr/bin/perl
package ReadData;
use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.14;

#

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $self = {};
    bless $self, $class;
    return($self);
}

sub getNames {
    # read in data
    my @data;
    print "\nName of first matrix? ";
    chomp($data[0] = <>);
    print "\nName of second matrix? ";
    chomp($data[1] = <>);
    return(@data);
}

sub printNames {
    my @name = @_;
    print "\nname1: " . $name[0];
    print "\nname2: " . $name[1];
}

1;

I have these subroutines in another version of the main program, and everything works fine there. I don't call the object, and the input names are reflected correctly in the output as seen bleow:

my @name = getNames();
printNames(@name);

sub getNames { same as above . . . }
sub printNames{ same as above . . . }

The code I have pasted at the very top technically WORKS, because it runs, and gives output, but the output is incorrect.

When I enter "A" as the first name, and "B" as the second name, this is what I get back:

>>> perl alt.pl

Name of first matrix? A

Name of second matrix? B

name1: ReadData=HASH(0x1d082f0)
name2: A

Can anyone help me to fix this? I've been reading like 50 perl tutorials online and I can't wrap my brain around what I'm supposed to be doing. My only other real programming experience is OOP in Java, and I don't follow this perl constructor stuff . . .

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the main thing you're missing is that when you call a method on an object:

$read->printNames(@name);

the object itself ($read) is passed into the method (printNames) as the first argument, before all the regular arguments. (In Java this happens implicitly — the object is just magically made available as this — but in Perl it's explicit — the object is $_[0].) So, you can change printNames to this:

sub printNames {
    my $this = shift;
    my @name = @_;
    print "\nname1: " . $name[0];
    print "\nname2: " . $name[1];
}

(Of course, in Perl, as in Java, it's more usual for instance methods to have something to do with the object. Your printNames method is strange in that it never uses $this at all. But this should get you started.)

share|improve this answer
    
ah thank you! i knew there was something that i was missing . . . it is weird that i am not using the object for anything, but this was just a bit of prototyping for me to test the creation / calling of a new object after exporting subroutines from my main script into a new package/module. i don't have any need to use / call that print method, it was basically just there to ensure that the package/object was working correctly and i didn't mess anything up :P –  user1947267 Mar 22 '13 at 2:34
    
@user1947267: You're welcome! And -- understood. Figuring-stuff-out code is not always realistic. :-) –  ruakh Mar 22 '13 at 2:40

You probably want to store the data within the object rather than copying it back and forth:

alt.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use ReadData;

my $read = ReadData->new();
$read->getNames();
$read->printNames();

ReadData.pm:

package ReadData;
use strict;
use warnings;

#

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $self = {};
    bless $self, $class;
    return($self);
}

sub getNames {
    my $self = shift;
    # read in data
    print "\nName of first matrix? ";
    chomp($self->{name1} = <>);
    print "\nName of second matrix? ";
    chomp($self->{name2} = <>);
    return;
}

sub printNames {
    my $self = shift;
    print "\nname1: " . $self->{name1};
    print "\nname2: " . $self->{name2};
}

1;
share|improve this answer
    
this is cool, tyvm! –  user1947267 Mar 24 '13 at 4:51

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