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in my code I use HANDLEs from windows.h. They are used like

HANDLE h;
if (!openHandleToSomething(arg1, arg2, &h)) {
    throw std::exception("openHandleToSomething error");
}
/* Use the handle in other functions which can throw as well */
if (!CloseHandle(h)) {
    throw std::exception("closeHandle error");
}

As you see, you have to insert this CloseHandle to every exception which can happen in the middle of acquiration and release. Therefore, it's likely you forget one (or there is a fancy SEH exception which you didn't know about) and voilà, you have your memory leak.

Recently, I've read about RAII which should remove the headaches from such cases and should call this CloseHandle automatically. I've also seen that there is something like std::auto_ptr<someType> in C++ which solves the problem for resources which were allocated with new.

However, since I don't use new and since HANDLE is just typedefed to be a void *, I wonder how I should use the std::auto_ptr<someType>. Somehow, it should be possible to give it a custom deleter function (if (!CloseHandle(h)) { throw std::exception("closeHandle error"); }). Creating a class would be another method since the destructor gets called any time an instance of it gets out of scope. However, it's just overkill to have a class for every simple thing.

How can I fix these accidential memory leaks?

Note that I would prefer solutions which are in pure C++ with no libraries and big dependencies except if they are really small and used in most of the environments anyways.

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

One idea that comes to mind is to use boost::shared_ptr with a custom deleter.

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2  
Yes, that’s one of the things that shared_ptr has been designed to to, and do well. This is definitely the best solution (although I usually avoid such absolutes). – Konrad Rudolph Oct 12 '09 at 19:05
    
@dalle: Ah, thanks for adding the link. That's a better example than mine. – Fred Larson Oct 12 '09 at 19:24
3  
Smart pointers is the wrong solution for this problem. What you need is a simple wrapper. – Loki Astari Oct 12 '09 at 20:08
1  
have found it out. need SP1 to update the <memory> file. without sp1 you won't have it. – Etan Oct 12 '09 at 21:33
2  
@Fred: We obviously disagree on what is complexity. But Shared pointer is obviously the wrong smart pointer. At best this should be a scopped pointer. There is no requirement to pass or share ownership through any other part of the code. It is created and destroyed in a single place that just needs exceptions safety. – Loki Astari Oct 12 '09 at 22:38

You can implement your own simple RAII idiom.

class auto_handle {
public:
    auto_handle() : handle_() {}
    ~auto_handle() {
        if (!CloseHandle(handle_)) {
            // Don't throw here (1), manage the error in other way.
        }
    }
    HANDLE& handle() { return handle_; }
private:
    auto_handle(const auto_handle&);
    auto_handle& operator=(const auto_handle&);
    HANDLE handle_;
};

(1) You should never throw from a destructor.

auto_handle h;
if (!openHandleToSomething(arg1, arg2, &h.handle())) {
    throw exception("openHandleToSomething error"); // Now it is safe
}
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I think you have issues here if you copy the handle. Each copy will try to close the same handle. – Fred Larson Oct 12 '09 at 19:45
    
@Fred, you were right. I fixed it. – fnieto - Fernando Nieto Oct 12 '09 at 19:57
    
what does handle_() and handle_(h) ?. handle is just a void*, how to call a function on it? – Etan Oct 12 '09 at 20:50
    
seems as it needs at least the default constructor since it doesn't compile otherwise. however, it doesn't seem to work. I just get a compiler error since it cannot convert from 'auto_handle *' to 'PHANDLE' – Etan Oct 12 '09 at 21:12
    
Why is the copy ctor private/unimplemented? DuplicateHandle exists for a reason. Note: It's OK for a copy ctor to fail by exception. – MSalters Oct 13 '09 at 14:01

1) Don't use auto_ptr<>. Seriously. You don't want those headaches-- it's far too easy to slip up b/c it doesn't have familiar copy semantics.

2) Wrap HANDLE with a simple object that provides an accessor that gives you the underlying handle. You'll need this to pass the HANDLE in to API calls. (I'd consider an accessor preferable to an implicit conversion.)

3) I've never actually bothered wrapping HANDLE, so I don't know if there are any surprising gotcha's. If there are, I can't point them out. I wouldn't expect any-- it's an opaque value. But then, who expects a surprising gotcha'? They're surprises, after all.

4) (Of course) implement the appropriate dtor.

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Your point 1 is incorrect. auto_ptr has pointer semantics, and it has its uses (improved by C++0x’ rvalue references). However, it simply cannot be used as a solution to this problem since it lacks the required features. – Konrad Rudolph Oct 12 '09 at 19:14
    
@fnieto: Who said anything about an ancestor? – Greg D Oct 12 '09 at 20:11
    
@Konrad: Is my correction more correct? – Greg D Oct 12 '09 at 20:12
    
@Greg, sorry. Just read bad. – fnieto - Fernando Nieto Oct 12 '09 at 21:10
    
@fnieto: No problem, we've all done it before. :) – Greg D Oct 13 '09 at 1:03

std::auto_ptr is not suitable for this situation. It has its uses, but this isn't one of them. To correct (sort of) a point raised by Greg D, the problem with auto_ptr isn't so much its lack of pointer semantics, as its rather odd ownership semantics -- when you assign one, you don't get a copy of the pointer, but instead a transfer of the pointer (i.e the assignee becomes the new sole owner of the resource, and the assigner no longer has anything).

You do want to wrap the handle in a class though. I've done this a number of times, and it works quite well. I haven't run into anything particularly surprising when doing it, though that doesn't necessarily mean a lot -- handles are used for a lot of things in Windows, and some of them might easily have some oddities.

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You just want a simple wrapper that gives you the handle when you pass it into a function:

#include <stdexcept>
class HWrapper
{
    HANDLE h;
    bool   closed;

    public:
        HWrapper(A1 arg1,A2 arg2)
            :closed(false)
        {
            if (!openHandleToSomething(arg1, arg2, &h))
            {    throw std::runtime_error("openHandleToSomething error");
            }
        }
        ~HWrapper()
        {
            try
            {
                if (!closed)
                {   close();
                }
            }
            catch(...) {/*Exceptions should never leave a destructor */ }
            // Though you may want to log somthing.
        }
        void close()
        {
            closed = true;
            // Close can throw an exception.
            if (!CloseHandle(h))
            {    throw std::runtime_error("closeHandle error");
            }
        }

        /*
         * This allows you to just pass it to a function that takes an HANDLE
         * See the function:   functionThatUsesHandleButMayThrow();
         */
        operator HANDLE()
        {
            return h;
        }
    private:
    /*
     * For your use case there is not need to copy.
     * So explicitly disallow copying.
     *
     * Just pass the HWrapper object to any function that requires a handle.
     * The built in cast operator will convert it back to a Handle to be used
     * within these functions. While this object just retains ownership and
     * responcability for deleting the object when you are finished.
     *
     * This allows simple backwards compatibility with existing code.
     */ 
    HWrapper(HWrapper const& copy);            // Don't implement
    HWrapper& operator=(HWrapper const& copy); // Don't implement


};

void functionThatUsesHandleButMayThrow(HANDLE h)
{
}



int main()
{

    try
    {
        HWrapper   w(A1,A2);

        functionThatUsesHandleButMayThrow(w);
        /*
         * If you do not care about close throwing an excepion.
         * Then jsut let it fall out of scope. The destructor
         * will try and clean up. But if it fails it will drop the
         * exception.
         *
         * This is required because if another exception is propogating
         * throwing an exception terminates the application.
         */
    }
    catch(std::exception const& e)
    {
        std::cout << "Exception: " << e.what() << "\n";
    }


    try
    {

        HWrapper   w2(A1,A2);

        functionThatUsesHandleButMayThrow(w2);
        /*
         * If you do care abou the exception
         * The call close() manually. The exception will be thrown.
         *
         * But if an exception is already been thrown in
         * functionThatUsesHandleButMayThrow() then we will try and close it
         * in the destructor and not throw another exception.
         */
        w2.close();
    }
    catch(std::exception const& e)
    {
        std::cout << "Exception: " << e.what() << "\n";
    }
}
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