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I'm trying to get a list of the number of entries in the changes_cc table by each user. Not all users have made entries into it, however for some reason it's returning "1" for each user that has 0 entries. I'm assuming that it's because it's counting the entries in the JOINed table. How can I make it so that it is "0" instead?

SELECT COUNT(*) as num, users.id, realname, username
            FROM changes_cc
            RIGHT JOIN users
                ON changes_cc.user_id = users.id
            GROUP BY users.id
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Try using an inner join instead –  John Conde Mar 22 '13 at 2:40
1  
@JohnConde that would only show the users that have entries. –  Mike Mar 22 '13 at 2:41
1  
Thanks for all the answers. They're all right. I'll have to use "eenie meenie miney moe" to decide who to accept ;) –  Mike Mar 22 '13 at 2:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think this should work -- count a specific field in the changes_cc table vs counting *:

SELECT u.id, realname, username, COUNT(c.id) as num
FROM users u 
    LEFT JOIN changes_cc c 
        ON u.user_id = c.id
GROUP BY u.id

I prefer reading a LEFT JOIN over a RIGHT JOIN, but they are both OUTER JOINs and work the same.

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You should not be using COUNT(*) (counts the record including null values) because it will normally give atleast 1 since it returns all records from the right table. If you specify the column name to be counted, it will gove you the result you want because COUNT only counts for NON_NULL value.

SELECT  COUNT(changes_cc.user_id) as num, 
        users.id, 
        realname, 
        username
FROM    changes_cc
        RIGHT JOIN users
            ON changes_cc.user_id = users.id
GROUP   BY users.id
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Instead of using count(*), use count(changes_cc.user_id).

The problem is that you are counting rows (with the *) rather than counting the non-NULL values in the "right-joined" table.

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