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I'm very new to java and found an exercise to work on basic thread synchronization. The problem is to print out 12345678910 10987654321 repeatedly until the program stops. Ten different threads should be used.

This is my code so far: I am first working on trying to get just the first number (number one to work), but it keeps giving me an exception

public static void main(String[] args){
   threadOne one = new threadOne();
   one.start();
    }
}

class updateNumber{
    private int i;
    synchronized void increase(int s){
        this.i=s;
        System.out.println(i);
    }
 } 

class threadOne extends Thread {
    private updateNumber grab;
     public void run() {
        try{
         grab.increase(1);
        }
        catch(Exception e){
         System.out.println("error in thread one");
        }
    }
}

I may be going about this the completely wrong way, but I've read a lot of documentation and am just thoroughly confused.

share|improve this question
2  
What exception? What line? When you are asking a question about an exception, you should post the stack trace. If necessary, you can use the printStackTrace method that exceptions have to print the stack trace. –  Ted Hopp Mar 22 '13 at 3:31
    
I defined threads 2-10 but havent implemented them, i took them out of main for it to be clearer. When I run the program, my output is "error in thread one" from the exception block. Ideally the output would be 1 as grab.increase(1) would be executed –  user1967688 Mar 22 '13 at 3:34
    
Please print a stack trace (using e.printStackTrace() and post the output. –  Ted Hopp Mar 22 '13 at 3:35
    
As a side comment, using 10 threads for this task is a horrible exercise. I can't imagine what you're expected to learn from it. Are you sure you shouldn't be using two threads--one to produce the numbers and one to consume them by printing them? –  Ted Hopp Mar 22 '13 at 3:36
    
Java tip: always capitalized your class names. The eyes of your more Java-experienced colleagues will thank you. –  cheeken Mar 22 '13 at 3:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like you didnt create a new instance of update

class threadOne extends Thread {
    private updateNumber grab;
     public void run() {
        try{
         grab.increase(1); // null pointer reference...<<<<<<<
        }
        catch(Exception e){
         System.out.println("error in thread one");
        }
    }
}

// you need to alocate memory to updateNumber like this

//private updateNumber grab = new updateNumber();

    class threadOne extends Thread {
        private updateNumber grab = new updateNumber(); 
         public void run() {
            try{
             grab.increase(1); 
            }
            catch(Exception e){
             System.out.println("error in thread one");
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
ah! that worked, thank you! –  user1967688 Mar 22 '13 at 3:38

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