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I have two C# methods RegisterTasks() and WaitForAll(), and whenever RegisterTasks() is called, WaitForAll() must be called in the same code block too. Just wondering if there's a way to tell C# compiler to make sure WaitForAll() always appear together with RegisterTasks(), and give a compiling error otherwise? Thanks~

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In a word, no. You'll have to follow the workarounds suggested by Igor or Jason. This is not an issue the compiler can help you with, it's one of design and making your API easy to use. –  Cody Gray Mar 22 '13 at 4:00
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4 Answers

Reduce the visibility of RegisterTasks() and WaitForAll(), and expose a method that calls them both.

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I believe the idea is that they must be called near each other, but not consecutively. –  Jason Watkins Mar 22 '13 at 4:46
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Then the new method should take a delegate to called in-between. –  Igor Mar 22 '13 at 4:49
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The short answer, as everyone else has said, is no.

I assume these methods are separate because the caller may wish to execute other code in between them. You may wish to consider creating a single combined method that takes a delegate as a parameter and then invokes that delegate when desired.

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No. You need to properly document the contract and trust the end user to use the methods correctly.

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No but you can do some designs. Example:

public void RegisterTasks(){
  // do something
  WaitForAll();
}

Or

public void RegisterTasks(){
  // do something
  privateWaitForAll();
}
public void WaitForAll(){
  // do something
  privateWaitForAll();
}
private void privateWaitForAll(){
  // do something
}
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