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I have a rest service for which I am sending the Json data as ["1","2","3"](list of strings) which is working fine in firefox rest client plugin, but while sending the data in application the structure is {"0":"1","1":"2","2":"3"} format, and I am not able to pass the data, how to convert the {"0":"1","1":"2","2":"3"} to ["1","2","3"] so that I can send the data through application, any help would be greatly appreciated.

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If the format of the json is { "index" : "value" }, is what I'm seeing in {"0":"1","1":"2","2":"3"}, then we can take advantage of that information and you can do this:

var myObj = {"0":"1","1":"2","2":"3"};
var convertToList = function(object) {
   var i = 0;
   var list = [];
   while(object.hasOwnProperty(i)) {   // check if value exists for index i
        list.push(object[i]);          // add value into list
        i++;                           // increment index
   } 
   return list;
};

var result = convertToList(myObj);    // result: ["1", "2", "3"]

See fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/amyamy86/NzudC/

Use a fake index to "iterate" through the list. Keep in mind that this won't work if there is a break in the indices, can't be this: {"0":"1","2":"3"}

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Not working still – user1490244 Mar 22 '13 at 9:19
    
@user1490244 Can you post your code and/or provide more information as to why it's not working still? maybe any errors being thrown? – sweetamylase Mar 22 '13 at 16:49

You need to parse out the json back into a javascript object. There are parsing tools in the later iterations of dojo as one of the other contributors already pointed out, however most browsers support JSON.parse(), which is defined in ECMA-262 5th Edition (the specification that JS is based on). Its usage is:

var str = your_incoming_json_string,
// here is the line ...
obj = JSON.parse(string);

// DEBUG: pump it out to console to see what it looks like
a.forEach(function(entry) {
  console.log(entry);
});

For the browsers that don't support JSON.parse() you can implement it using json2.js, but since you are actually using dojo, then dojo.fromJson() is your way to go. Dojo takes care of browser independence for you.

var str = your_incoming_json_string,
// here is the line ...
obj = dojo.fromJson(str);

// DEBUG: pump it out to console to see what it looks like
a.forEach(function(entry) {
  console.log(entry);
});

If you're using an AMD version of Dojo then you will need to go back to the Dojo documentation and look at dojo/_base/json examples on the dojo.fromJson page.

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