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I am making a two classes, the constructing class and the main method where I read a number from a user input and spits out the prime factorizations of the number, code is with Java.

For Example:
Enter Number: 150
5
5
3
2

However, for my program I'm getting the entire list of factors.

Example:
Enter Number: 150
150
75
50
25
5
3
1

How would I change this up to get prime factors?

Main Method:

import java.util.*;

public class FactorPrinter
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Enter a integer: ");
        String input1 = scan.nextLine();
        int input = Integer.parseInt(input1);
        FactorGenerator factor = new FactorGenerator(input);
        System.out.print(factor.getNextFactor());

        while (!factor.hasMoreFactors())
        {
            System.out.print(factor.getNextFactor());
        }
     }  
}

Here is my class:

public class FactorGenerator 
{
    private int num;
    private int nextFactor;

    public FactorGenerator(int n)
    {
        num = nextFactor = n;
    }

    public int getNextFactor()
    {
        int i = nextFactor - 1 ;

        while ((num % i) != 0)
        {
            i--;
        }

        nextFactor = i;
        return i;
    }

    public boolean hasMoreFactors()
    {
        if (nextFactor == 1)
        {
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
}
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1  
if memory serves, all you have to do to get prime factors is to repeatedly divide by the smallest number you can, starting at 2, and thenn work up from there. for example, 14 is divisible by 2, so 2 is a prime factor, 7 is not divisble by 2 so you cant divide anymore, try 3, then 4,5,6, then 7. boom, prime factors are 2 and 7. –  Mark Mar 22 '13 at 5:47
    
@EJP: It does actually. For example, when factoring "12", 4 is a factor right? 4 will never turn up in my algo because 4 is divisible by 2, which you already divided out. Takes awhile to wrap your head around, but it only turns out primes ;) –  Mark Mar 22 '13 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

A corrected version of @Bohemian's deleted answer:

for (int i = 2; input > 1 && i <= input; i++)
{
    if (input % i == 0)
    {
        System.out.print(i+" ");
        do
        {
            input /= i;
        } while (input % i == 0);
    }
}

There are much faster algorithms, e.g. Knuth The Art of Computer Programming, Vol I, #4.5.4 algorithm C, which derives from Fermat, but note that there is an important correction on his website. He gives a good testing value as 8616460799L as it has two rather large prime factors.

share|improve this answer
    
@SunilRk Your code doesn't print out prime numbers either: it is also O(N). Nothing to recommend it at all, sorry. –  EJP Mar 22 '13 at 6:51
    
Thank you for the help, I got the code to work but, when the code is repeating a prime factor it doesn't print. –  user2197917 Mar 22 '13 at 8:09
    
A prime factor is a prime factor. It's not supposed to be printed twice. –  EJP Mar 22 '13 at 9:02
    
I was explained that prime factors are the combinations that directly make up the integer so 150 = 5 x 5 x 3 x 2. I agree with your statement though. –  user2197917 Mar 22 '13 at 9:55
1  
@user2197917 If you want the factors repeated, just move the print inside the do/while loop. –  EJP Mar 23 '13 at 1:11

You can add a method to check if the factor being returned is a prime factor or not : Try something like this :

public bool isPrime(int number) {
    int i;
    for (i=2; i*i<=number; i++) {
        if (number % i == 0) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

And you can use this as :

 public class FactorPrinter
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        //your initial code

        while (!factor.hasMoreFactors())
        {
            int nextFactor= factor.getNextFactor()

            if(isPrime(nextFactor))
           {
            System.out.print();
           }
        }
     }  
}
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