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I need to write a valid T-SQL query version of the following pseudo-code:

select * from newTable where [name] like in (
    select [name] from oldTable
)

I'm not sure how to go about this. Any help (even directing me to an existing question) would be great. Thanks!

Edit: Per some comments I will clarify this particular case. The tables look like this:

oldTable
code varchar(10)
name varchar(500)

newTable
code varchar(10)
name varchar(500)

In all of the cases where oldTable.code <> newTable.code, I am wanting to see if the oldTable.name is like one of the names in newTable.name. Basically, some of the new names have had qualifiers added to the beginning or end of the names. ie: 'old name' may have a 'qualified old name' in the newTable. Thanks again.

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how about some examples of new and old names that are "like" and some that are "not like" each other? –  KM. Oct 12 '09 at 19:27
    
can you give some sample data; you have several solutions below which may work, but depend a lot on how the data is stored. –  Stuart Ainsworth Oct 12 '09 at 19:51
1  
@Aaron Palmer, you need to give actual examples of old names and new names and if they are "like" each other. does old "bbb" match new "xbbb"? does old "xyz" match "abc"? does old "abcxyz" match "abc", etc. if you don't want to give examples, give the rules for finding matches. –  KM. Oct 12 '09 at 21:10
    
@KM, sorry I thought I had been clear enough in my edit. When I say "like" i mean the ANSI SQL definition of LIKE. So, old "bbb" will match new "xbbb" and old "abc" will match new "abcxyz", but old "abcxyz" will not match new "abc" and old "xyz" will certainly not match new "abc". I hope this clears up the confusion a bit for you. I have found a solution that works for me and I posted it below. I really appreciate everyone's responses. –  Aaron Palmer Oct 13 '09 at 13:31

9 Answers 9

Assuming the two tables relate in some way.

SELECT newTable.* FROM newTABLE JOIN oldTable ON <JOIN CRITERIA>
WHERE newTable.[Name] LIKE oldTable.name
share|improve this answer
1  
without using a wildcard it will work the same as = –  KM. Oct 12 '09 at 19:28
    
In my opinion this is the only solution that you should use. –  ChaosPandion Oct 12 '09 at 20:08
DECLARE @nt TABLE (NAME VARCHAR(10))
DECLARE @ot TABLE (NAME VARCHAR(10))

INSERT INTO @nt VALUES('Stuart')
INSERT INTO @nt VALUES('Ray')


INSERT INTO @ot VALUES('St%')
INSERT INTO @ot VALUES('Stu%')


SELECT *
FROM @nt n
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT *
    			FROM @ot o
    			WHERE n.name LIKE o.name)
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Unlike the join answers this will only return one record, although you could use a join and use a select distinct, depending on which one ended performing better. –  Yishai Oct 12 '09 at 19:36
    
do you really think that the OP is storing a "%" in oldTable.name?? like in your example –  KM. Oct 12 '09 at 19:38
1  
No. I have no clue how the OP is storing his data, but he asked for "any help". At least my sample code provided some sample data to work with. :) –  Stuart Ainsworth Oct 12 '09 at 19:53
1  
I forgot to mention that you can always add qualifiers if necessary; e.g: WHERE n.name LIKE '%' + o.name + '%' –  Stuart Ainsworth Oct 12 '09 at 19:54

Not so pretty, but it works:

SELECT DISTINCT newTable.*
FROM newTABLE
JOIN oldTable
ON newTable."Name" LIKE oldTable.name

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I think you just need to remove the like eg:

select * from newTable where [Name] in (select name from oldTable)

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Thanks everyone. I used the following query, inspired by both LukLed's answer and a comment by Stuart Ainsworth.

SELECT DISTINCT old.code, old.name, new.name, new.code 
FROM newTable new 
JOIN oldTable old
ON new.name LIKE '%' + old.name + '%' 
WHERE new.code <> old.code
ORDER BY old.name, new.name

Performance isn't that great, but it's a one time analysis and it gets the job done.

The reason I chose this over the "EXISTS" version is because it gives me both results from the new and old tables.

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you can probably get rid of the DISTINCT; it isn't buying you much since you're displaying both the old and new columns. The DISTINCT was there in case the new columns had multiple matches on old columns; in this case, if they do, you're still showing them :) –  Stuart Ainsworth Oct 12 '09 at 20:46

Name like Name? well, you cannot do a LIKE and IN at the same time.

This looks like a good candidate for SOUNDEX

Do a JOIN with a SOUNDEX.

read up here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa259235%28SQL.80%29.aspx

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+1, based on the lack of info in the question, this is the only answer that might work –  KM. Oct 13 '09 at 13:09

We ran into the same issue ourselves. It may not work for you, but the solution we came up with is: SELECT [Fields]
FROM [Table]
WHERE [Field] like 'Condition1'
OR [Field] like 'Condition2'

Not a great solution, but it works for us.

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If you use very rarely used cross apply you can do this with ease.
(temp table declaration stolen code from Stuart)

2 tables do not need to have any relationship as Matthews' answer.

DECLARE @nt TABLE (NAME VARCHAR(10))
DECLARE @ot TABLE (NAME VARCHAR(10))

INSERT INTO @nt VALUES('Stuart')
INSERT INTO @nt VALUES('Ray')


INSERT INTO @ot VALUES('St%')
INSERT INTO @ot VALUES('Stu%')

select	distinct n.NAME
from	@nt n
	cross apply @ot o
where	n.NAME like o.name
share|improve this answer
    
Why cross apply versus cross join? Cross join will be available in older versions of SQL Server as well as other RDBMSes. But maybe there is a subtlety I'm missing. –  Shannon Severance Oct 13 '09 at 2:32

A mere stab in the dark but this is awfully reminiscent of a situation involving non-scalar data. Quick example using csv format (SQL Server 2005 and above):

WITH oldTable ([name])
     AS
     (
      SELECT '003,006,009,012,015'
      UNION ALL
      SELECT '005,015'
     ),
     newTable ([name])
     AS
     (
      SELECT '007'
      UNION ALL
      SELECT '009'
      UNION ALL
      SELECT '015'
     )
SELECT N1.[name]
  FROM newTable AS N1
 WHERE EXISTS (
               SELECT * 
                 FROM oldTable AS O1
                WHERE ',' + O1.[name] + ','
                         LIKE '%,' + N1.[name] + ',%' 
              );
share|improve this answer

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