Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm not sure exactly if this is a problem of Eclipse, Java, or my computer. What I'm trying to do is basically 2^57885161-1. But, sadly, all that Eclipse outputs is "Infinity". My deduction is either that Java sets a limit to the maximum of a computed equation, Eclipse does, or that my Computer cannot handle the amount of computational ability it would require.

If it is Java or Eclipse, is there a way that I can remedy the situation?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Why???? Getting 7Mb of 0xFF should not be sooooo complicated... –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 22 '13 at 5:54
    
The answer is 17million+ digits long, so you know... –  Kinz Mar 22 '13 at 5:55
1  
Sure. Or to be precise - "integer" represented in binary as 7235645 bytes with value 0xFF. Still very interesting why do you need that. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 22 '13 at 6:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the java.math.BigDecimal (or java.math.BigInteger) class for extremely large numbers.

What's probably happening is that you're using an int or a double, and that number is MUCH too large for those datatypes in Java. Using BigDecimal, which can be arbitrarily long, will solve your problem given time.

edit - previously I had written "java.util.BigDecimal", which is the wrong package.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that you'll still fill 17MB with this number alone. –  Jan Dvorak Mar 22 '13 at 6:13
    
I believe this will work, but given the size of the requested number, I'm sure it'll take a very long time to equate. Thank you for the response. I was totally unaware of this awesome package! –  Kinz Mar 22 '13 at 6:28
1  
Yeah. It'll take an extremely long time to do that calculation. Since you know it's going to be all ones however, there's a shortcut: you could fill a byte[] with the requisite number of 0xff 's and then use the BigInteger's byte[] constructor. That would be somewhat faster, but it'll still be pretty unwieldy. –  scott_fakename Mar 22 '13 at 6:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.