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The problem is a bowling system which the wording of the question says:

The application will randomly choose the number of pins knocked down, with a double chance to numbers 7,8,9 and 10.

The way I implemented is something like

So I came up with something like this:

pins = [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0] // (1 for pin knocked down / 0 for pin standing)

for(i=0; i<pins.length; i++)

    if(pins[i]==0): //pin isn't already down

        if(i<6) 
            if(random(0~100) < 50):
                pins[i] = 1 //knock down
        else
            if(random(0~100) < 66):
                pins[i] = 1 //knock down


ex: [0,1,0,1,0,0,1,1,1,1] // 6 pins knocked down.

So I was just doing a probability of 1/2 to the pins 0-6 and 2/3 to pins 7-9 and I just sum all elements off the array to know home many pins have been dropped.

But I realized that I never get a strike nor a zero, so I start to wondering if I'm doing this wrong.

Let's say that that all pins have equal chance, and I could just do pinsDropped = random(0,10) and I would eventually get strikes (10) 9% chance and 0 pins dropped as well. But I have 4 pins that have double the chance of being dropped, I should have getting strikes more often.

What I'm doing wrong?


Update:

Yes, I suck at probability. After talking to a other people, one pointed to me that I also suck reading questions wording. I completely misinterpreted the problem. When it says randomly choose the number of pins knocked down and double the chance to numbers 7,8,9,10.

It means that I'm more likely to knock down 10 pins than 6 pins.

7 pins, 8 pins, 9 pins and 10 pins. Not pin 7, pin 8, pin 9 and pin 10.

I'm totally frustrated about my stupidness.

So I overcomplicated this a lot,

function try(pins, prob) {
    if (prob > pins)
        prob = pins;
    aleat = mt_rand(0, pins+prob);
    if (aleat > pins)
        aleat -= prob;
    return aleat;
}
share|improve this question
1  
A bit unrelated to your problem and I could be missing something but wouldn't double a 50% chance be a 75% chance? –  lc. Mar 22 '13 at 6:01
    
I calculate a 3% chance of a strike, according to this code (which doesn't seem to fit the problem statement very well). Is this what you expected? What frequency of strikes do you observe? –  Beta Mar 22 '13 at 12:49
    
@Beta If the probability is equal, and I would select a random between 0 and 10, the probability of a strike (10) would be 9%. And with 4 pins with a double chance, the probability shouldn't be less than 9%. You see the problem? –  Vitim.us Mar 22 '13 at 16:14
    
Yes, I see the problem. Please don't take this as an attack, but you simply don't understand probability. If the pins are independent (which they are, in your code), then having equal probabilities for each pin, and having equal probabilities for each possible number of pins knocked down (neglecting the "double chance" for now) are incompatible. You can't have both. I'll explain in an answer if you like, or you can do some experiments flipping coins to see the effect. –  Beta Mar 22 '13 at 18:30

2 Answers 2

Simple answer:

def randomChoose():
    x = randint(1,14);
    if x<=7:
        return x;
    else:
        return 6+ (x-5)/2;
share|improve this answer

The application will randomly choose the number of pins knocked down, with a double chance to the pins 7,8,9 and 10.

Problem Description:

  • We have 10 pins in total.

  • pins 7,8,9 and 10 have double chance.

  • we've (6 * 1) + (4 * 2) = 6 + 8 = 14 chances in total.

  • A = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 } ; a is in A

  • B = { 7, 8, 9, 10 } ; b is in B

  • P(a) = 1/14

  • P(b) = 2P(a) = 2/14 = 1/7

Proposed Solution (Java):

Code:

ArrayList<byte> pins = new ArrayList<byte>();
pins.addAll({1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10});

while (pins.size() > 0)
{
    /** pre-trial **/

    PinsExperiment.trial(pins);

    /** post-trial **/
}

Classes:

class PinsExperiment
{
    public static byte getChances(ArrayList<byte> pins)
    {
        byte c = 0;

        for (byte b : pins)
        {
            if (b <= 6) c += 1;
            else c += 2;
        }

        return c;
    }

    public static void trial(ArrayList<byte> pins)
    {
        byte chances = getChances(pins);

        byte r = Math.ceil(Math.random(0,chances));

        byte n = 0;

        for (byte b : pins) if (b <= 6) n++;

        if (r <= n) pins.remove(pins.get(r-1));
        else pins.remove(pins.get(((r-n)/2)-1)+n);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this was my first though, but I need to in some way mark pins individually because I need to knock the pins left on the next take, because if a pin is left, in the second take I would have different chances if this pin is 1 to 6 or 7 to 10. or if you have a better idea than a array like in my pseudocode. –  Vitim.us Mar 22 '13 at 6:18
    
So as the pin goes down, the experiment state changes. I'll edit my solution –  Khaled A Khunaifer Mar 22 '13 at 6:21
    
I got the behind idea, but I don't got the else pins.remove(pins.get(((r-n)/2)-1)); and trial() seems to always remove a pin, I'm supposed to call trial() randomly from 0 to 10 times per take? –  Vitim.us Mar 22 '13 at 7:14
    
thanks, 4:50AM here I need a rest, I will take a deep look afternoon –  Vitim.us Mar 22 '13 at 7:51
    
edited: else pins.remove(pins.get(((r-n)/2)-1)+n); .. ex: {1,2,4,7}, chances=3+2, r=5, n=3, (r > n), (4,5) are associated with pin#7; ((r-n)/2)-1)+n = ((5-3)/2)-1)+3 = ((2/2)-1)+3 = (1-1)+3 = 0+3 = 3 .. pins.remove(3) .. {1,2,4} ~ 7 was removed –  Khaled A Khunaifer Mar 22 '13 at 12:39

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