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AFAIK interrupt-handling must be implemented in assembly when I RTFM.

The eret instruction is used to resume execution at the pre-exception address.

Can this reason be generalized also for x86, that you can't write an operating system with no assembly instruction no matter what the chip is? Is this a practical result or proven theoretically? Is there some main difference between assembly languages and other languages that causes this difference? I speculate that assembly languages don't have so-called BNF, is that true? So that assembly languages don't have a so-called context-free grammar and assembly languages are not implemented with yacc, bison, flex, lex but more like according to hardware chips?

The lowlevel code I'm working with looks like this and I wanna know why it can't be done in C (or Java etc) since these results appear to contradict that 2 turing complete implementations can solve same problem, so if language A is turing complete and language B also is turing complete then any problem A is able to solve is also solvable in language B.

Please if you can teach me the concepts as I think I can learn individual instructions myself, but I don't know how to answer questions about assembly programming in general such as being asked why I do it with assembly instead of C, then why C and not OOP and so.

################################################################
#
# Definitions for important devices and addresses in this system.
#

# Uart_0 at 0x860

.equ de2_uart_0_base,0x860

# Timer_1 at 0x920, interrupt index 10 (mask 2^10 = 0x400)

.equ de2_timer_1_base,0x920
.equ de2_timer_1_intmask,0x400

# Timeout value for 0,1 ms tick-count interval (CHANGED in every version)

.equ de2_timer_1_timeout_value,4999

# Required tick count per time-slice, meaning
# the number of timer-interrupts before a thread-switch is performed

.equ oslab_ticks_per_timeslice,100

# Interrupt address at 0x800020

.equ de2_nios2_interrupt_address,0x800020

#
# End of device-address definitions
#
################################################################

################################################################
#
# Definition of variables for keeping system time etcetera.
#

.data
.align 2
.global oslab_internal_globaltime
oslab_internal_globaltime:  .word 0

# Definition of variable for remembering the number of
# timer-interrupts since the last thread-switch

.data
.align 2
.global oslab_internal_tickcount
oslab_internal_tickcount:   .word 0

# Definition of system (interrupt) stack, sp, and gp

.data
.align 2
oslab_internal_gp:  .word 0
oslab_internal_sp:  .word 0
oslab_system_stack: .fill 256,1,0
oslab_system_stacktop:

# Definition of the end-of-timeslice message.

oslab_internal_yield_message:
                    .asciz "\n#### Thread yielded after using %d tick%c."

#
# End of system-time variable definitions.
#
################################################################

################################################################
#
# Interrupt handling code.
#

# Stub for interrupt handler

.text
oslab_internal_stub:
    movia   et,oslab_exception_handler
    jmp     et

# The interrupt handler

oslab_exception_handler:
    # Check source of exception, following the procedure
    # described in the Nios II Processor Reference Handbook.

    rdctl   et,estatus      # Check ESTATUS
    andi    et,et,1         # Test EPIE
    beq     et,r0,oslab_exception_was_not_an_interrupt
    rdctl   et,ipending     # Check IPENDING
    beq     et,r0,oslab_exception_was_not_an_interrupt

    # If control comes here, we have established that the
    # exception was caused by an interrupt.
    # Subtract 4 from ea, so that the interrupted instruction
    # will be re-run when we return.

    subi    ea,ea,4

    # Check the source of the interrupt.
    # Possible source No. 1: Timer_1 (currently the only source).

    rdctl   et,ipending
    andi    et,et,de2_timer_1_intmask
    bne     et,r0,oslab_timer_1_interrupt

    # If control comes here, we have an interrupt from an unknown source.
    # This condition is IGNORED in this version of OSLAB.

    eret

oslab_exception_was_not_an_interrupt:

    # Test if the interrupted instruction was a TRAP

    subi    sp,sp,4         # PUSH r8 (instruction 1)
    stw     r8,0(sp)        # PUSH r8 (instruction 2)

    movia   r8,0x003b683a   # binary code for TRAP
    ldw     et,-4(ea)       # Load interrupted instruction
    cmpeq   et,et,r8        # Compare to binary code for TRAP

    # Result from comparison is now in et.

    ldw     r8,0(sp)        # POP r8 (instruction 1)
    addi    sp,sp,4         # POP r8 (instruction 2)

    # Use the comparison result in et as branch condition.
    # The value in et will also be used later, to tell if the
    # exception was a trap or an interrupt.

    bne     et,r0,oslab_trap_handler

    # If control comes here, we have an exception which was not a TRAP.
    # This should not normally happen.
    # However, someone writing programs for the OSLAB micro-operating system
    # could perhaps use unimplemented instructions. To catch unimplemented
    # instructions, we insert a BREAK instruction here. This will stop execution
    # unless the program is run through the debugger.

    break 0
    eret

oslab_timer_1_interrupt:

    # Acknowledge the timer_1 interrupt.

    movia   et,de2_timer_1_base
    stw     r0,0(et)

    # Save contents of R8, to get a free register for
    # temporary values.

    subi    sp,sp,4
    stw     r8,0(sp)        # PUSH r8

    # Increase system clock.

    movia   r8,oslab_internal_globaltime
    ldw     et,0(r8)
    addi    et,et,1
    stw     et,0(r8)

    # Increase tick counter.

    movia   r8,oslab_internal_tickcount
    ldw     et,0(r8)
    addi    et,et,1
    stw     et,0(r8)

    # Restore original contents of R8.

    ldw     r8,0(sp)        # POP r8
    addi    sp,sp,4

    # Check value of tick counter,
    # against the required number of ticks per time-slice.
    # Note: oslab_ticks_per_timeslice is an assembler constant,
    # and not a variable. Hence, no load/store-instructions here.

    subi    et,et,oslab_ticks_per_timeslice

    # If the result from the subtraction is zero (or perhaps positive),
    # then it is time to switch threads.

    bge     et,r0,oslab_time_to_switch

    # If we fall-through here, then we have had one of those many
    # timer interrupts on which we should not switch threads.
    # Return to caller.

    eret

oslab_time_to_switch:

    # This code will now fall-through into the TRAP handler
    # which performs a context switch.
    #
    # We will print out a message for each timer interrupt.
    # To be able to tell that we had a timer interrupt, and not
    # a TRAP, we set et to zero.

    movi    et,0

oslab_trap_handler:

    # Save registers r1 through r23, plus fp, gp, ra and ea

    .set noat               # R1 is used here.
    subi    sp,sp,108       # Make room for all registers. 
    stw     r1, 4(sp)       # R1 is saved in slot 1, not slot 0.
    stw     r2, 8(sp)
    stw     r3,12(sp)
    stw     r4,16(sp)
    stw     r5,20(sp)
    stw     r6,24(sp)
    stw     r7,28(sp)
    stw     r8,32(sp)
    stw     r9,36(sp)
    stw    r10,40(sp)
    stw    r11,44(sp)
    stw    r12,48(sp)
    stw    r13,52(sp)
    stw    r14,56(sp)
    stw    r15,60(sp)
    stw    r16,64(sp)
    stw    r17,68(sp)
    stw    r18,72(sp)
    stw    r19,76(sp)
    stw    r20,80(sp)
    stw    r21,84(sp)
    stw    r22,88(sp)
    stw    r23,92(sp)
    stw    r26,96(sp)
    stw    r28,100(sp)
    stw    r31,104(sp)
    stw     ea,0(sp)        # Special case, saved in slot 0.

    mov     r4,sp           # Copy stack pointer to param1 register
    movia   sp,oslab_system_stacktop     # Use system stack instead

    # Test et to see if this was a timeout event or a TRAP.

    beq     et,r0,oslab_not_a_trap

    # If this was a trap event, we fall through here.
    # Our simplified printf is used to print a message,
    # saying that the previous thread yielded parts of its time-slice.

################################################################
#
#   The following code prints a nice message. Nothing more.
#   This code saves and restores all registers it uses.
#   You can safely ignore the following code, up to
#   (but NOT including) the label oslab_not_a_trap.
#
    subi    sp,sp,4         # Contents of r4 must be preserved.
    stw     r4,0(sp)        # PUSH r4.

    movia   r4,oslab_internal_yield_message
    movia   r5,oslab_internal_tickcount
    ldw     r5,0(r5)
    movi    r6,0            # Gold-plating: check if 1 tick or several ticks.
    subi    et,r5,1         # Do not print the s if only 1 tick.
    beq     et,r0,oslab_no_plural_ticks
    movi    r6,'s'          # If 0 ticks, or 2 or more ticks, print the s.
oslab_no_plural_ticks:
    call    printf

    ldw     r4,0(sp)        # POP r4
    addi    sp,sp,4
#
#   This comment marks the end of the code for printing a nice message.
#   Now comes other code, which is potentially much more interesting.
#
################################################################

    # Move on to thread-switch code.

oslab_not_a_trap:

    # Clear tick counter, since we are going to switch threads.

    movia   et,oslab_internal_tickcount
    stw     r0,0(et)

    # Now it is time to execute the thread-switch code.
    # We use the more general callr, rather than call.

    movia   et,oslab_internal_threadswitch
    callr   et              # Call thread switch routine written in C

    mov     sp,r2           # Copy return value to stack pointer
                            # Yes, the system stack pointer is lost,
                            # but who cares? We will not need it any more.

    # restore registers
    ldw     r1, 4(sp)
    ldw     r2, 8(sp)
    ldw     r3,12(sp)
    ldw     r4,16(sp)
    ldw     r5,20(sp)
    ldw     r6,24(sp)
    ldw     r7,28(sp)
    ldw     r8,32(sp)
    ldw     r9,36(sp)
    ldw    r10,40(sp)
    ldw    r11,44(sp)
    ldw    r12,48(sp)
    ldw    r13,52(sp)
    ldw    r14,56(sp)
    ldw    r15,60(sp)
    ldw    r16,64(sp)
    ldw    r17,68(sp)
    ldw    r18,72(sp)
    ldw    r19,76(sp)
    ldw    r20,80(sp)
    ldw    r21,84(sp)
    ldw    r22,88(sp)
    ldw    r23,92(sp)
    ldw    r26,96(sp)
    ldw    r28,100(sp)
    ldw    r31,104(sp)
    ldw     ea,0(sp)        # Special case
    addi    sp,sp,108

    eret                    # Return from exception

#
# End of exception handling code.
#
################################################################

################################################################
#
# Startup code.
#
# When the system is started, Altera-supplied code initializes the
# Nios II CPU and cache memories, and then calls alt_main.
#

.global alt_main
alt_main:
    wrctl   status,r0       # Disable interrupts.
    wrctl   ienable,r0      # Clear all bits in IENABLE.

    # Now copy the stub.

    movia   r8,oslab_internal_stub
    movia   r9,de2_nios2_interrupt_address
    ldw     r10,0(r8)
    stw     r10,0(r9)
    ldw     r10,4(r8)
    stw     r10,4(r9)
    ldw     r10,8(r8)
    stw     r10,8(r9)

    # Initialize timer_1.

    movia   r8,de2_timer_1_base
    movia   r9,de2_timer_1_timeout_value
    srli    r10,r9,16
    stw     r10,12(r8)      # Write periodh
    andi    r10,r9,0xffff
    stw     r10,8(r8)       # Write periodl
    movi    r10,7           # Continuous, interrupt on timeout, and start
    stw     r10,4(r8)

    # Initialize CPU for interrupts from timer_1.

    movi    r10,de2_timer_1_intmask
    wrctl   ienable,r10
    movi    r10,1
    wrctl   status,r10

    # Call to main. Do not jump, main is a subroutine,
    # and may execute a ret instruction.

    subi    sp,sp,4
    stw     ra,0(sp)        # PUSH r31
    movia   r8,main
    callr   r8
    ldw     ra,0(sp)        # POP r31
    addi    sp,sp,4

    # If main returns, we will return directly to the routine
    # that called us (that called alt_main).

    ret

#
# End of startup code.
#
################################################################

################################################################
#
# Helper functions for initialization and thread handling.
#

.text
.align 2
.global oslab_internal_get_gp
oslab_internal_get_gp:
    mov     r2,gp
    ret

.global oslab_begin_critical_region
oslab_begin_critical_region:
    wrctl   status,r0
    ret

.global oslab_end_critical_region
oslab_end_critical_region:
    movi    r8,1
    wrctl   status,r8
    ret

.global oslab_get_internal_globaltime
oslab_get_internal_globaltime:
    movia   r2,oslab_internal_globaltime
    ldw     r2,0(r2)
    ret

.global oslab_get_internal_tickcount
oslab_get_internal_tickcount:
    movia   r2,oslab_internal_tickcount
    ldw     r2,0(r2)
    ret

.global oslab_yield
oslab_yield:
    trap
    ret

#
# End of helper functions.
#
################################################################
#
# ********************************************************
# *** You don't have to study the code below this line ***
# ********************************************************
#
################################################################
#
# A simplified printf() replacement.
# Implements the following conversions: %c, %d, %s and %x.
# No format-width specifications are allowed,
# for example "%08x" is not implemented.
# Up to four arguments are accepted, i.e. the format string
# and three more. Any extra arguments are silently ignored.
#
# The printf() replacement relies on routines
# out_char_uart_0, out_hex_uart_0,
# out_number_uart_0 and out_string_uart_0
# in file oslab_lowlevel_c.c
#
# We need the macros PUSH and POP - definitions follow.

# PUSH reg - push a single register on the stack

.macro PUSH reg
    subi sp,sp,4    # reserve space on stack
    stw  \reg,0(sp) # store register
.endm

# POP  reg - pop a single register from the stack

.macro POP  reg
    ldw  \reg,0(sp) # fetch top of stack contents
    addi sp,sp,4    # return previously reserved space
.endm

.text
.global printf
printf:
    PUSH    ra      # PUSH return address register r31.
    PUSH    r16     # R16 will point into format string.
    PUSH    r17     # R17 will contain the argument number.
    PUSH    r18     # R18 will contain a copy of r5.
    PUSH    r19     # R19 will contain a copy of r6.
    PUSH    r20     # R20 will contain a copy of r7.
    mov     r16,r4  # Get format string argument
    movi    r17,0   # Clear argument number.
    mov     r18,r5  # Copy r5 to safe place.
    mov     r19,r6  # Copy r6 to safe place.
    mov     r20,r7  # Copy r7 to safe place.
asm_printf_loop:
    ldb     r4,0(r16)   # Get a byte of format string.
    addi    r16,r16,1   # Point to next byte
    # End of format string is marked by a zero-byte.
    beq     r4,r0,asm_printf_end
    cmpeqi  r9,r4,92    # Check for backslash escape.
    bne     r9,r0,asm_printf_backslash
    cmpeqi  r9,r4,'%'   # Check for percent-sign escape.
    bne     r9,r0,asm_printf_percentsign
asm_printf_doprint:
    # No escapes present, just print the character.
    movia   r8,out_char_uart_0
    callr   r8
    br      asm_printf_loop
asm_printf_backslash:
    # Preload address to out_char_uart_0 into r8.
    movia   r8,out_char_uart_0
    ldb     r4,0(r16)   # Get byte after backslash
    addi    r16,r16,1   # Increase byte count.
    # Having a backslash at the end of the format string
    # is illegal, but must not crash our printf code.
    beq     r4,r0,asm_printf_end
    cmpeqi  r9,r4,'n'   # Newline
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_backslash_not_newline
    movi    r4,10       # Newline
    callr   r8
    br      asm_printf_loop
asm_printf_backslash_not_newline:
    cmpeqi  r9,r4,'r'   # Return
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_backslash_not_return
    movi    r4,13       # Return
    callr   r8
    br      asm_printf_loop
asm_printf_backslash_not_return:
    # Unknown character after backslash - ignore.
    br      asm_printf_loop
asm_printf_percentsign:
    addi    r17,r17,1   # Increase argument count.
    cmpgei  r8,r17,4    # Check against maximum argument count.
    # If maximum argument count exceeded, print format string.
    bne     r8,r0,asm_printf_doprint
    cmpeqi  r9,r17,1    # Is argument number equal to 1?
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_not_r5 # beq jumps if cmpeqi false
    mov     r4,r18      # If yes, get argument from saved copy of r5.
    br      asm_printf_do_conversion
asm_printf_not_r5:
    cmpeqi  r9,r17,2    # Is argument number equal to 2?
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_not_r6 # beq jumps if cmpeqi false
    mov     r4,r19      # If yes, get argument from saved copy of r6.
    br      asm_printf_do_conversion
asm_printf_not_r6:
    cmpeqi  r9,r17,3    # Is argument number equal to 3?
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_not_r7 # beq jumps if cmpeqi false
    mov     r4,r20       # If yes, get argument from saved copy of r7.
    br      asm_printf_do_conversion
asm_printf_not_r7:
    # This should not be possible.
    # If this strange error happens, print format string.
    br      asm_printf_doprint
asm_printf_do_conversion:
    ldb     r8,0(r16)   # Get byte after percent-sign.
    addi    r16,r16,1   # Increase byte count.
    cmpeqi  r9,r8,'x'   # Check for %x (hexadecimal).
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_not_x
    movia   r8,out_hex_uart_0
    callr   r8
    br      asm_printf_loop
asm_printf_not_x:
    cmpeqi  r9,r8,'d'   # Check for %d (decimal).
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_not_d
    movia   r8,out_number_uart_0
    callr   r8
    br      asm_printf_loop
asm_printf_not_d:
    cmpeqi  r9,r8,'c'   # Check for %c (character).
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_not_c
    # Print character argument.
    br      asm_printf_doprint
asm_printf_not_c:
    cmpeqi  r9,r8,'s'   # Check for %s (string).
    beq     r9,r0,asm_printf_not_s
    movia   r8,out_string_uart_0
    callr   r8
    br      asm_printf_loop
asm_printf_not_s:
asm_printf_unknown:
    # We do not know what to do with other formats.
    # Print the format string text.
    movi    r4,'%'
    movia   r8,out_char_uart_0
    callr   r8
    ldb     r4,-1(r16)
    br      asm_printf_doprint
asm_printf_end:
    POP     r20
    POP     r19
    POP     r18
    POP     r17
    POP     r16
    POP     ra
    ret

#
# End of simplified printf() replacement code.
#
################################################################
.end
share|improve this question
1  
ASM is for all intents and purposes direct machine code. C gets compiled into machine code. "for all intents and purposes" because nearly all ASM mnemonics are representations of binary strings fed to the CPU. –  dingrite Mar 22 '13 at 6:23
1  
@dingrite Assembly is not direct machine code. Many instructions have multiple possible encodings at least in x86 and x86-64, and the choice between these can be important for code efficiency (due to cache size), and the specific encoding used is crucial for self-modifying code, where you need to know which encoding is used. Self-modifying code is not used that much anymore, but sometimes it can be used to reduce the code size, which can be important eg. in bootloader code. –  nrz Mar 22 '13 at 6:33
    
@nrz Please elaborate as much as you want. Thank you. –  Niklas Rosencrantz Mar 22 '13 at 12:07
1  
@nrz I have not really witnessed that while disassembling, perhaps those interpretations have been hidden to operate at runtime on the CPU's whims? I always see direct memory bytes converted into ASM instructions and do likewise in reverse. –  dingrite Mar 22 '13 at 14:10
1  
@dingrite Mapping from machine code to x86 assembly/disassembly code is not-injective and surjective (Wikipedia: Bijection, injection and surjection), so every x86 assembly instruction gets mapped, but some get mapped by several different machine code encodings. Practically you don't need to worry about it before you reverse-engineer or write self-modifying code or something like that. See it yourself eg. with udcli: echo 'd1 e0 d1 f0 39 34 21 39 34 61 39 34 a1 39 34 e1' | udcli -x -32 –  nrz Mar 22 '13 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why assembly?

Assembly typically has a 1:1 relationship with the chip's ISA. An assembly instruction typically has the form:

<opcode> <lhs>,<rhs>

This works at the lowest possible level, so the programmer can take care of individual processor features.

Assembly still needs an assembler to be run by a processor. The assembler turns the symbolic assembly into a binary representation that the processor understands.

This is similar to how a compiler works. At the highest level, compilers usually turn the source code into an abstract syntax tree, and from there generates code, which may be assembly, code in another language, or machine code.

Why not a higher level language?

A compiler could theoretically be written for any language to produce any arbitrary machine code. This means that you could also theoretically handle any instruction that assembly has access to (such as interrupts) provided your compiler knew how to interpret your higher level code.

As in this answer, most operating systems handle interrupts for you, and abstract them out with signals. But there's nothing stopping you from handling them yourself, for example, Arduino makes this possible in C++. The problem, however, is that an operating system will not allow just any program to access interrupts, especially since some interrupts require a privileged CPU mode.

ALso, there's nothing precluding you from using an OO language (or functional, etc) to implement something low-level like a kernel, but the more complicated the language, the more difficult it is to produce efficient machine code, and when you're building software that other software will be running on, it needs to be as fast as possible. You won't be able to use some features like garbage collection (which is common in many OO languages) because nothing is there to clean up after you.

Why C?

There's nothing inherent about OO that makes it slow, and there's nothing inherent about assembly that makes it fast. It's just easier to write code for a processor when you know exactly what your code is doing.

When you write in C, you're just one level above assembly. It's high-level enough to give you concepts like functions, structs and variables, yet low-level enough that you can make reasonable assumptions about what code is generated. In fact, disassembling a program a not a bad way to optimize C code. Try doing that with something like Java!

share|improve this answer
    
+1,but.. the compiler turns the source code into an abstract syntax tree not all compilers use AST.So,I think that you can use a word such as "usually," or make this statement so that make it clear not all do this. Just a comment,don't get me wrong please :) –  Jack Mar 23 '13 at 17:26
    
Done, but most do. –  tjameson Mar 23 '13 at 20:38

Assembly language: The computation in assembly language program is less than machine language. This program runs faster to produce the desired result as compared to high lavel language. This programme contains more instruction than High level language. The programme written on one computer can't be used on any other computer.

High level language: The computation in high lavel language program is less than assembly language. this program runs slower to produce the desired result as compared to Assembly language. This programme Contains less instruction than Assembly Language. The programme written on one computer can be used on other computer.

share|improve this answer
    
I can write assembly programs that are very inefficient and run slowly. I can also write C++ programs that are very efficient and run extremely fast. –  Bo Persson Mar 22 '13 at 12:13

Programming languages tend to avoid, or at best average out, capabilities of the processors they run on. There are operations on most systems that are required (return from interrupt is a good example) but cannot be directly implemented in the high level language. There are a few solutions for this, one is compiler specific directives, putting some flavor of the word interrupt in the function declaration will tell some compilers that this function is special and needs to be wrapped such that it can be an interrupt handler, which is generally different from the frame of a normal function.

Because there will never be a universal assembly language/instruction set, you cannot create common high level language features to match the hardware, it doesnt make sense, it is so trivial to just solve those problems in a few line of assembly, that even if there were a universal instruction set, I doubt the high level languages would waste any effort on those kinds of features.

Even with C there is some level of bootstrapping required, setting a stack pointer perhaps, putting .data in the right place, zeroing out .bss, etc. Interestingly the Cortex-M processor core has hardcoded some things into the hardware such that you can create applications with almost no assembly, the vector table is all that is required other than the C code, and typically that vector table is just asm directives, but possible to have no asm instructions in that table. IF/when the calling convention changes for the compilers then all of the sudden the hardware doesnt match and you have a problem, so how long this will live is anyones guess. Because these are microcontrollers and not higher level systems, the solution does not translate.

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