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I have a number of classes that represents business transaction calls: executing appropriate stored procedures.

Now the looks like this:

public static class Request
{
    public static void Approve(..) {
        using(connection) {
            command.Text = "EXEC [Approve] ,,"]
            command.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
    }
}

And I want to make them more thread-safe:

public class Request {
    public static void Approve(..) {
        new Request().Approve(..);
    }

    internal void Approve(..) {
        using(connection) {
            command.Text = "EXEC [Approve] ,,"]
            command.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
    }
}

But getting next error message:

The call is ambiguous between the following methods or properties: 'MyNamespace.Request.Approve(..)' and 'MyNamespace.Request.Approve(..)'

How can I force, mark that I'm calling non-static, instance method from static?

Or I cannot do that without renaming one of the methods? Or moving static method to another class, etc

share|improve this question
3  
You might be interested in some of the design decisions involving disambiguation of static methods from instance methods in C#. The rules appear to be a bit strange, but in fact they are carefully designed. Here's an article I wrote on the subject recently: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/07/06/color-color.aspx – Eric Lippert Oct 12 '09 at 22:19
    
@Eric Lippert Hello, Eric. Thanks a lot for the link! I got a lot of new information. btw I'm reading your blog (in Russian translation by Gaidar) – abatishchev Oct 13 '09 at 18:19
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're making a call from an instance (e.g. requestVar.Approve()), then no, you have to rename it. The static can be called by using Request.Approve() however.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, because you're calling Approve() from an instance of the Request class. To call the static method unambiguously, you would do Request.Approve(). And anyways, doing a static method and an instance method with the same signature would generate a compiler error. – mgbowen Oct 12 '09 at 19:41
    
You're right, sorry, didn't read your answer carefully – abatishchev Oct 12 '09 at 19:44
1  
It's no problem :). But as per LBushkin's answer, you should probably just rename the internal method to InternalApprove() or something similar, or perhaps rethink your class structure. – mgbowen Oct 12 '09 at 19:47
    
I just cannot name a static class :) What postfix sounds good for it? RequestManager? RequestMapper? RequestFactory? – abatishchev Oct 12 '09 at 19:50
    
It depends on what you're trying to do. Since both methods return void, RequestFactory wouldn't sound right. IMHO, I would choose RequestManager, but you know your own code :). – mgbowen Oct 12 '09 at 19:51

C# allows does not allow static methods to be called through instance references. As such - the methods must either be named differently or use argument overloading to differentiate static methods from instance methods.

In your example, since the Approve() method is internal, renaming it is probably your easiest option.

As to marking that a method is static ... I (personally) think the name is a perfectly good means to differentiate the two - why invent something more complicated.

share|improve this answer
1  
Your first sentence is erroneous. C# certainly does NOT allow static methods to be called through instance references. – Eric Lippert Oct 12 '09 at 22:14
    
Indeed. How embarrassing. – LBushkin Oct 13 '09 at 1:26

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