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I'm wondering if it would be feasible to automatically test for race conditions using a debugger.

For example, imaging you want to test a multi-threaded queue. Amongst others you would want to test that you can concurrently call enqueue() and dequeue().

A simple unit-test could be able to start two threads, each calling enqueue() and dequeue() respectively in a loop and checking the results:

// thread A
for( int i=0; i<count; i+=1 ) {
  enqueue( queue, i );
}

// thread B
for( int i=0; i<count; i+=1 ) {
  ASSERT( i == dequeue( queue ) );
}

Now, a clever test-driver, running the unit-test in gdb or lldb, should be able to wait for breakpoints set inside both loops and then use the debuggers si (step instruction) command to simulate all possible interleavings of the two threads.

My question is not if this is technically possible (it is). What I want to know is this:

Assuming the enqueue() function has 10 instructions and the dequeue() function has 20 - how many different interleavings does the test have to try?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Let's see...

If we only have 2 instructions in each: a,b and A,B:

a,b,A,B
a,A,b,B
a,A,B,b
A,a,b,B
A,a,B,b
A,B,a,b

That's 6.

For a,b,c and A,B,C:

a,b,c,A,B,C
a,b,A,c,B,C
a,b,A,B,c,C
a,b,A,B,C,c
a,A,b,c,B,C
a,A,b,B,c,C
a,A,B,b,c,C
a,A,b,B,C,c
a,A,B,b,C,c
a,A,B,C,b,c
A,a,b,c,B,C
A,a,b,B,c,C
A,a,B,b,c,C
A,B,a,b,c,C
A,a,b,B,C,c
A,a,B,b,C,c
A,B,a,b,C,c
A,a,B,C,b,c
A,B,a,C,b,c
A,B,C,a,b,c

That's 20, unless I'm missing something.

If we generalize it to N instructions (say, N is 26) in each and start with a...zA...Z, then there will be 27 possible positions for z (from before A to after Z), at most 27 positions for y, at most 28 for x, at most 29 for w, etc. This suggest a factorial at worst. In reality, however, it's less than that, but I'm being a bit lazy, so I'm going to use the output from a simple program calculating the number of possible "interleavings" instead of deriving the exact formula:

1 & 1 -> 2
2 & 2 -> 6
3 & 3 -> 20
4 & 4 -> 70
5 & 5 -> 252
6 & 6 -> 924
7 & 7 -> 3432
8 & 8 -> 12870
9 & 9 -> 48620
10 & 10 -> 184756
11 & 11 -> 705432
12 & 12 -> 2704156
13 & 13 -> 10400600
14 & 14 -> 40116600
15 & 15 -> 155117520
16 & 16 -> 601080390

So, with these results you may conclude that while the idea is correct, it's going to take an unreasonable amount of time to use it for code validation.

Also, you should remember that you need to take into account not only the order of instruction execution, but also the state of the queue. That's going to increase the number of iterations.

EDIT: Here's the program (in C):

#include <stdio.h>

unsigned long long interleavings(unsigned remaining1, unsigned remaining2)
{
  switch (!!remaining1 * 2 + !!remaining2)
  {
  default: // remaining1 == 0 && remaining2 == 0
    return 0;

  case 1: // remaining1 == 0 && remaining2 != 0
  case 2: // remaining1 != 0 && remaining2 == 0
    return 1;

  case 3: // remaining1 != 0 && remaining2 != 0
    return interleavings(remaining1 - 1, remaining2) +
           interleavings(remaining1, remaining2 - 1);
  }
}

int main(void)
{
  unsigned i;
  for (i = 0; i <= 16; i++)
    printf("%3u items can interleave with %3u items %llu times\n",
           i, i, interleavings(i, i));
  return 0;
}

EDIT2:

Btw, you could also save an order of magnitude (or two) of the overhead due to interfacing with the debugger and due to the various context switches, if you simulate pseudo-code instead. See this answer to a somewhat related question for a sample implementation. This may also give you a more fine grained control over switching between the threads than direct execution.

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Wow, thank you very much! That is exactly what I wanted to know. Also, the example is especially helpful (seeing how you shifted the capital letters to the front it is easy to understand the pattern). –  svckr Mar 22 '13 at 11:06
    
No problem. Just added the program for the reference. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 22 '13 at 11:47
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