Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following is a base-2 implementation of the Cooley-Tukey FFT algorithm (found on Rosetta Code). After one run of FFT, the data array will go from coefficient to point-value representation. How do you convert back to coefficient?

#include <complex>
#include <iostream>
#include <valarray>

const double PI = 3.141592653589793238460;

typedef std::complex<double> Complex;
typedef std::valarray<Complex> CArray;

// Cooley–Tukey FFT (in-place)
void fft(CArray& x)
{
    const size_t N = x.size();
    if (N <= 1) return;

    // divide
    CArray even = x[std::slice(0, N/2, 2)];
    CArray  odd = x[std::slice(1, N/2, 2)];

    // conquer
    fft(even);
    fft(odd);

    // combine
    for (size_t k = 0; k < N/2; ++k)
    {
        Complex t = std::polar(1.0, -2 * PI * k / N) * odd[k];
        x[k    ] = even[k] + t;
        x[k+N/2] = even[k] - t;
    }
}

int main()
{
    const Complex test[] = { 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 };
    CArray data(test, 8);

    fft(data);

    for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << data[i] << "\n";
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Compute an inverse FFT

Change

-2 * PI * k / N

to

2 * PI * k / N

And after doing the inverse FFT, scale the outputs by 1/N

share|improve this answer
2  
You may also need to rescale ..... –  Roger Rowland Mar 22 '13 at 8:51
    
I've tried swapping the sign, with inaccurate results. The book I'm reading (Cormen's Intro to Algorithms) says that the inverse FFT is found by doing an FFT on the PV representation, replacing w_n with w_n^-1 and dividing each element by n. I've been fiddling around with the code, but I'm having difficulty understanding either this code or the book well enough to get it working. Switching the k to k-1 in the combine stage didn't net any results either. –  Josh Mar 22 '13 at 9:56
    
Yes, as roger rowland says, you also need to rescale the outputs by 1/N –  Anthony Blake Mar 23 '13 at 7:49

Added to the Rosetta Code

// inverse fft (in-place)
void ifft(CArray& x)
{
    // conjugate the complex numbers
    std::transform(&x[0], &x[x.size()], &x[0], std::conj<double>);

    // forward fft
    fft( x );

    // conjugate the complex numbers again
    std::transform(&x[0], &x[x.size()], &x[0], std::conj<double>);

    // scale the numbers
    x /= x.size();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.