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I have been playing around with LINQ to Z3 for fun (not production use).

I've ended up with this syntax as a start:

var i = 123;
var test2 = from t in TheormProver.NewTheorm()
            let f = TheormProver.Func<int, bool>()
            let a = TheormProver.Int
            let g = TheormProver.Func<bool, int>()
            where !f(a * 2) && g(f(g(f(4)))) == i * a && a < g(f(a))
            select new { f = f.ToString(), g = g.ToString(), a, asd = "Test extra property" };

var solution = test2.Solve(); // Edited in for clarification
// note that test2 is a TheormProver<T> which has a "T Solve()" method defined.

The static TheromProver.Int and TheormProver.Func methods/properties simply return a basic type (as per their name) currently.

Moving forwards I want to make a sort of Variable<T> type that contains more information than just a value.

TL;DR: The problem I'm having is that I want f and g variables to be a custom type that I can add fields and properties to, but I still want to be able to use them with the syntax I've got in the where clause (i.e. as a method/Func).

So, How do I create a custom type that can be used in method syntax while adding/having my own properties?

Note that I don't care if calling the method does nothing, or doesn't work as I'll be manipulating the where clause so they'll never get invoked/executed.


Example:

var test2 = from t in TheormProver.NewTheorm()
            let f = TheormProver.Func<int, bool>()
            let a = TheormProver.Int
            where !f(a * 2) && a > 3 // f is used to create a method call expression
            select new { f , a };

var testSolution = test2.Solve();

var fSolution = testSolution.f; // F is its own type with unique properties/fields.

var fConstraints = fSolution.Constraints;

var fSomeProperty = fSolution.SomeProperty;

foreach(var constraint in fConstraints)
{
    //.....
}

I've mocked up a quick example of the work in progress syntax I have so far:

http://liveworkspace.org/code/3Fm6JM$0

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class TheormProver
    {
        public static int Int { get { return default(int); } } // Really this would return my Variable<int>
        public static Func<T, TResult> Func<T, TResult>() { return default(Func<T, TResult>); } // Really this would return my Variable<Func<T, TResult>>

        protected List<Expression> Constraints; // Holds constraints / where clauses that get translated into the Z3 language

        //This gets called when we do the first "let" and gets us into the correctly typed world with a generic parameter
        public virtual TheormProver<T> Select<T>(Func<TheormProver, T> sel)
        {
            return new TheormProver<T>(Constraints);
        }
    }

    // This is what the user of the library sees and is returned by a from t in new TheormProver(). T will be the anonymous type from the last let
    class TheormProver<T> : TheormProver
    {
        public TheormProver(List<Expression> Constraints)
        {

        }

        // This gets called on subsequent "let"s, going from the anonymous type with one property "f" to one with 2, "f, g". Chaining this way allows as many lets as we want
        public virtual TheormProver<U> Select<U>(Expression<Func<T, U>> sel)
        {
            return new TheormProver<T, U>(sel, Constraints.ToList());
        }

        public virtual TheormProver<T> Where(Expression<Func<T, bool>> constraint)
        {
            var result = (TheormProver<T>)this; // This should be a clone to allow composable queries

            result.Constraints.Add(constraint);

            return result;
        }

        public virtual T Solve(out bool foundSolution)
        {
            // TODO: Call Z3 and get a solution
            foundSolution = false;
            return default(T);
        }
    }

    internal class TheormProver<T, U> : TheormProver<U>
    {
        private LambdaExpression Selector;
        private TheormProver<T> InternalTheorumProver;

        public TheormProver(Expression<Func<T, U>> selector, List<Expression> constraints)
            : base(constraints)
        {
            Selector = selector;
            InternalTheorumProver = new TheormProver<T>(constraints);
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var test = from t in new TheormProver()
                       let f = TheormProver.Func<int, bool>()
                       let g = TheormProver.Func<bool, int>()
                       let a = TheormProver.Int
                       where g(f(a)) == 0
                       select new { f, g, a };

            bool foundSolution;
            var testSolution = test.Solve(out foundSolution);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I think it would be helpful if you could show an example of what you are trying to achieve, even if that is not valid syntax. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 22 '13 at 9:00
    
Thanks for taking a look, see my edit. –  George Duckett Mar 22 '13 at 9:13
    
Why not create a type that has those properties and the func? let f = new MyType(TheormProver.Func<int, bool>()) ... where !f.Func(a * 2) –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 22 '13 at 9:16
    
That will work as an alternative, but ideally I'd like to keep the where clauses as simple as possible. I like the simplicity of being able to do f(g(a), g(123)) = 123 etc. –  George Duckett Mar 22 '13 at 9:18
    
The only other alternative I've come up with is keeping f as a Func but having an extension method that they would use in the select that converts it to my special type for the purposes of getting the right return type for the select statement (similar to my current syntax with the .ToString()). –  George Duckett Mar 22 '13 at 9:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I've created a simple 'testbed' for your original code: http://liveworkspace.org/code/3Bl7wC$0.

With, a bit of dynamic magic, you can have the following class as a drop-in replacement for Func<T1, T2>:

public class MyCallable<T1, T2> : DynamicObject
{
    private readonly Expression<Func<T1, T2> > _wrapped;
    private readonly Func<T1, T2> _compiled;

    public MyCallable(Expression<Func<T1, T2>> towrap) 
    { 
        _wrapped = towrap; _compiled = _wrapped.Compile(); 
    }

    public override bool TryInvoke(InvokeBinder binder, object[] args, out object result)
    {
        if ( (args.Length == 1) && 
             (args[0].GetType() == typeof(T1)))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(@"Invoking ""{0}"" on {1}", _wrapped, args[0]);
            result = _compiled((T1) args[0]);
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            //throw new ArgumentException("Cannot invoke " + _wrapped + " with the arguments passed");
            result = null;
            return false;
        }
    }
}

As you can see, it defines you class as being "dynamic" and allows you to try and invoke it as if it were a delegate/function/... a general callable:

// in "TheormProver"
public static dynamic Func<T1, T2>() { return new MyCallable<T1, T2>(arg1 => default(T2)); }

Here's proof it works: http://liveworkspace.org/code/4kBypd$0

Output:

Invoking "arg1 => False" on 0
Invoking "arg1 => False" on 4
Invoking "arg1 => 0" on False
Invoking "arg1 => False" on 0
Invoking "arg1 => 0" on False
Invoking "arg1 => False" on 0
Invoking "arg1 => 0" on False

Full code for reference:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Dynamic;

public class Program
{
    public class MyCallable<T1, T2> : DynamicObject
    {
        private readonly Expression<Func<T1, T2> > _wrapped;
        private readonly Func<T1, T2> _compiled;

        public MyCallable(Expression<Func<T1, T2>> towrap) 
        { 
            _wrapped = towrap; _compiled = _wrapped.Compile(); 
        }

        public override bool TryInvoke(InvokeBinder binder, object[] args, out object result)
        {
            if ( (args.Length == 1) && 
                 (args[0].GetType() == typeof(T1)))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(@"Invoking ""{0}"" on {1}", _wrapped, args[0]);
                result = _compiled((T1) args[0]);
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                //throw new ArgumentException("Cannot invoke " + _wrapped + " with the arguments passed");
                result = null;
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    public static class TheormProver
    {
        public static object[] NewTheorm() { return new object[] { 1 }; }
        public static dynamic Func<T1, T2>() { return new MyCallable<T1, T2>(arg1 => default(T2)); }
        public static int Int { get; set; }
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var i = 123;
        var test2 = from t in TheormProver.NewTheorm()
            let f = TheormProver.Func<int, bool>()
            let a = TheormProver.Int
            let g = TheormProver.Func<bool, int>()
            where !f(a * 2) && g(f(g(f(4)))) == i * a && a < g(f(a))
            select new { f = f.ToString(), g = g.ToString(), a, asd = "Test extra property" };

        test2.ToList().ForEach(Console.WriteLine);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Very nice idea. Does it work as part of an expression tree? I'm not so familiar with dynamic. –  usr Mar 22 '13 at 9:53
    
Indeed a cool idea. I wasn't even aware that a dynamic object could behave like a delegate. But I see the same problem as usr: It most likely won't work correctly in expression trees because the whole code is only evaluated at runtime. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 22 '13 at 9:54
    
@usr I'm not sure what you mean by "as part of an expression tree". In general, the answer is "yes": it is just normal usage of the DLR. However, if you mean, is it strong typed at the expression level, the answer is "no". This is the nature of 'dynamic': it's late bound, however you get the full benefit of proper overload resolution, extension method resolution, user defined conversions and other things that don't work in 'normal' C# generics. –  sehe Mar 22 '13 at 9:55
    
As I understand it the OP is picking apart the IQueryable he gets to generate Z3 terms. He needs the same ability when working with dynamic in this case. Not sure if you can use dynamic as part of an Expression. –  usr Mar 22 '13 at 9:57
    
@DanielHilgarth I agree. The limitations you mentioned were explicitely not requirements in the question, though. The question focused fully on 'function invocation' syntax compatibility, AFAICS –  sehe Mar 22 '13 at 9:57

You can't add custom members to delegate types and you cannot overload operator () in C#. That leaves you with extension methods.

Now, you don't want to add extensions to very general delegate types like Func<int, int> because that pollutes the namespace. I suggest you create custom delegates like this:

delegate TResult Z3Func<T1, TResult>(T1 arg1);

Then you can add extensions to Z3Func.

The extension calls will end up as static method calls in the expression tree you are analyzing.

share|improve this answer
    
As long as the extension method on the general Func is not in a generally used namespace, I don't think intellisense pollution is a problem. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 22 '13 at 9:40
    
Why was this accepted so quickly? I'm still writing an answer that actually works with unmodified syntax. Hang on 5 minutes –  sehe Mar 22 '13 at 9:49
    
@sehe: Now you got me interessted. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 22 '13 at 9:50
    
@DanielHilgarth Just posted it –  sehe Mar 22 '13 at 9:51
    
@sehe: Unaccepted. I'll leave it open for a day or two to give more chance for better answers. –  George Duckett Mar 22 '13 at 9:55

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