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If my fgets is in a while loop, it only returns half the string. If it's in a for loop, it returns the whole string.. Any idea why?

Code below:

    FILE *fp; // File pointer
    char filename[] = "results.tsv";
    fp = fopen(filename, "r"); // Open file argv[1] for READ


    char s[4096];

    int num = atoi(fgets(s, sizeof(s), fp)); // Get first line (number of units in file)

    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < num; i++)
    {
        printf("%s", fgets(s, sizeof(s), fp)); // Prints everything
    }


    while (fgets(s, sizeof(s), fp) != NULL) // Loop until no more lines
    {
        printf("%s\n", s); // Only prints the x's
    }

    fclose(fp); // Close file

And the files contents:

1
xxxxxxxx       yyyy       eee

Where the big spaces are tabs (\t).

If I run it, I get:

For loop only:

xxxxxxxx       yyyy       eee

While loop only:

xxxxxxxx

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Did you try removing the for and using only the while? Because I don't see resetting of the position in the file after the for. –  Kiril Kirov Mar 22 '13 at 10:19
    
Just so it won't be any misunderstandings. You have tried once with the for loop but not the while loop, and a second time with the while loop but not the for loop? In other words, your real code doesn't look like it does in the question, i.e. you really don't have both loops after each other? –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 22 '13 at 10:20
2  
I only put them both in here to show you the two codes. In my code I have only one of them. –  Travv92 Mar 22 '13 at 10:21
1  
I compile your code with only while loop, it prints xxxxxxxx yyyy eee though –  ChiaraHsieh Mar 22 '13 at 10:27
1  
Works For Me (TM). Please post code that reproduces your problem. –  Michael Foukarakis Mar 22 '13 at 10:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As already diagnosed, your code 'works for me'. Here's the SSCCE I created for it. If invoked with no arguments, it uses the while loop. If invoked with any arguments, it uses the for loop. Either way, it works correctly for me. Note that the code doesn't use the return value from fgets() directly; it checks that the input operation succeeded before doing so. It also echos what it is doing and reading as it goes.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    FILE *fp;
    char filename[] = "results.tsv";

    if ((fp = fopen(filename, "r")) == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: failed to open file %s\n", argv[0], filename);
        exit(1);
    }

    char s[4096];

    if (fgets(s, sizeof(s), fp) == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Premature EOF\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    int num = atoi(s);
    printf("Num lines: %d\n", num);

    if (argc > 1)
    {
        printf("For loop:\n");
        for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
        {
            if (fgets(s, sizeof(s), fp) == 0)
            {
                fprintf(stderr, "Premature EOF\n");
                exit(1);
            }
            printf("%d: %s", i+1, s);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        int i = 0;
        while (fgets(s, sizeof(s), fp) != NULL)
        {
            printf("While loop:\n");
            printf("%d: %s", ++i, s);
        }
    }

    fclose(fp);

    return 0;
}

If you use this code and it fails on your system, then you could submit your evidence. Amongst other things, you should identify the platform on which you're working, and you should give a hex dump (or equivalent) of the data in the file results.tsv. The data file I used, for example, contained the bytes:

0x0000: 31 0A 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 09 79 79 79 79 09   1.xxxxxxxx.yyyy.
0x0010: 65 65 65 65 0A                                    eeee.
0x0015:
share|improve this answer

Before start reading with while loop, you have to make the position of reading from the stream(file) start at the same position where the for loop start reading

You can do it with one of the 2 ways:

1) close the file and reopen it and read the first line before starting the while loop

2) Use the fseek (as KiriliKirov said) to point at the same position where the for loop start reading. To do you have get the current position (position where the for loop start reading) with the ftell() function:

int num = atoi(fgets(s, sizeof(s), fp));
long int start_read = ftell (fp); // get the current postion //add this line in your code

.....

fseek ( fp , start_read , SEEK_SET ); // add this line in your code
while (fgets(s, sizeof(s), fp) != NULL)

The second solution will avoid the close and the reopen the file and the read of the first line.

ftell() returns the current value of the position indicator of the stream.

fseek() Sets the position indicator associated with the stream to a new position

share|improve this answer
    
Why? (.........) –  Kiril Kirov Mar 22 '13 at 10:21
    
because the fgets make the file pointer pointing at the end of the last readed charachter. In this cas the for loop make make the position of the file pointer at the end of the file. –  MOHAMED Mar 22 '13 at 10:22
    
Well, fseek could be used, instead of closing and opening the file again. –  Kiril Kirov Mar 22 '13 at 10:22
    
yes it could be another alternative –  MOHAMED Mar 22 '13 at 10:24

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