Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am kinda new to C and I am having trouble using If statements to compare character input from the user to an int stored in an array.

Eg:

    int i[2] = {1,2};
    char input[3];
    printf("Select option:");
    fgets(input,3,stdin);

    if(strcmp(*input,i[0]) == 0)
       printf("1 chosen");
    if(strcmp(*input,i[1]) == 0)
       printf("2 chosen");

When compiling I get a warning for both compare statements saying:

    warning: passing argument 1 of 'strcmp' makes pointer from integer without cast
    warning: passing argument 2 of 'strcmp' makes pointer from integer without cast   

I understand that this maybe because Im comparing non-string elements, but how will I cast them then compare them?

When executing I get:

     Segmentation fault(core dumped)

Can somebody help?

share|improve this question
2  
oh, you don't compare numbers that way – Hayri Uğur Koltuk Mar 22 '13 at 11:03
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Better convert input char to int using atoi function.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdlib/atoi/

int i[2] = {1,2};
char input[3];
int opt=0;
printf("Select option:");
fgets(input,3,stdin);
opt = atoi(input); 
if(opt== i[0])
   printf("1 chosen");
if(opt == i[1])
   printf("2 chosen");
share|improve this answer

Nobody yet has explained why what you are doing is incorrect, apart from saying that it is "wrong".

A string in C is just a bunch of consecutive characters in memory, where the last character in the string has a value of zero. You can store a string in a char array, or you can point to somewhere in memory by using a char pointer (char*).

When you input a decimal number, you are reading individual characters that happen to be in the range '0' through to '9', maybe prefixed by an optional '-'. You read these as a string, and if you want to treat them as integers you need to convert them to an integer data type (instead of a series of char values).

That's where something like atoi helps, although it is no longer fashionable. You should use strtol. [There is a whole family of these functions for dealing with unsigned, long long, or combinations thereof, as well as double and float types].

That tackles roughly half of your question. Now, you are using strcmp and expecting it to work. There are a couple of things wrong with what you are doing. The major error is that you can't treat an integer as a string. If you really want to use string comparison, you have to convert the integer to a string. That means you do the reverse of what strtol does.

That's a bigger discussion, and in your case it is not the correct way so I won't go into it. But I'd like to point out that, all things being equal, you are sending the wrong types to strcmp. It expects two char* pointers (const char *, really). What you have done is dereferenced your input pointer to a char for the first element, and then pass an int for the second.

strcmp(*input,i[0])

A pointer is basically just a number. It gives the memory address of some data. In this case, the data is expected to be char type (single bytes). The strcmp function is expecting valid memory addresses (stuff that's actually in your stack or heap). But what you give it is *input (the value of the first character in your input string) and i[0] (the number 1).

Those compiler warnings were telling you something quite important, you know! =)

So, just for completeness (although others have answered this already), you should forget the string comparisons (and make a mental note to learn more about strings in C), and do this:

int value = strtol( input, NULL, 10 );

if( value == i[0] )
   printf("1 chosen");
if( value == i[1] )
   printf("2 chosen");

There are other ways to go about this. I could talk about how to convert single-digit numbers from a string, but I think I have already ranted for long enough. Hope this is of some help.

share|improve this answer

Apart from the various methods listed as answers to your qn.

Why don't you take the user input as int??

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{

int i[2] = {1,2};
int input;
    printf("Select option:");
    scanf("%d",&input);

    if(input==i[0])
       printf("1 chosen");
    if(input==i[1])
       printf("2 chosen");

return 0;

}
share|improve this answer

You must use scanf instead of fgets:

int input;
printf("Select option:");
scanf("%d", &input);
if (input == i[0])

etcetera.

See http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C_Programming/Simple_input_and_output#Input_using_scanf.28.29

share|improve this answer
    
...as SuvP already wrote. – Marco Sulla Mar 22 '13 at 11:18

You need to compare the input string vs. some known strings. But you're comparing the first character vs. some ints. strcmp() will do what you need if you pass it the right arguments: two strings.

share|improve this answer

here you are trying to compare a string to an integer using strcmp:

if(strcmp(*input,i[0]) == 0)

that won't work.

you could do that way:

const char *numbers[2] = {"1", "2"};
char input[3];
printf("Select option:");
fgets(input,3,stdin);

if(strcmp(*input, numbers[0]) == 0)
    printf("1 chosen");
if(strcmp(*input, numbers[1]) == 0)
    printf("2 chosen");

where you compare two strings, instead of comparing a number to a string

or you could convert the input string to an int using sscanf or atoi

int i[2] = {1,2};
char input[3];
int num;

printf("Select option:");
fgets(input,3,stdin);

sscanf(input, "%d", &num);

if(num == i[0])
   printf("1 chosen");
else if(num == i[1]) 
   printf("2 chosen");

i didn't compile them though, maybe there's sth which i am missing but that's the general idea

share|improve this answer
    
or, like in SuvP's answer, simply take the user input as int. – Hayri Uğur Koltuk Mar 22 '13 at 11:09

Use atoi. it will convert your string to integer

 int i[2] = {1,2};
    char input[3];
    printf("Select option:");
    fgets(input,3,stdin);

    if(atoi(input)==i[0]))
       printf("1 chosen");
    if(atoi(input)==i[1]))
       printf("2 chosen");
share|improve this answer
1  
atoi() is dangerous, in a similar fashion to gets(), you can have UB without a lot of care. You should use strtol() in newer code. – Randy Howard Mar 22 '13 at 11:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.