Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

There are plenty of topics covering the question. But nevertheless I have a problem.

I load the assembly into new AppDomain like this:

public void Run()
{
    //There's the problem.
    //As Panos Rontogiannis mentioned the thread is created in default AppDomain
    new Thread(RunApp).Start();
}

private void RunApp()
    try
    {
        AppDomain.CreateDomain("domain name").ExecuteAssembly("path to assembly");
    }
    catch (Exception _e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Unhandled Exception.\n" + _e);
    }
}

In the Main method of the loaded assembly I subscribe my handler to the UnhandledException event:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += handleException;

The handler itself:

public static void handleException(object a_s, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs a_args)
{
    var _e = (Exception)a_args.ExceptionObject;
    //Static loger class method
    Loger.WriteError(_e.GetType().ToString(), _e.Message, "default solution");
}

But wherever the exception is thrown in the loaded assembly the handler doesn't get involved. I only catch exception in the default AppDomain (first try{} catch{}).

share|improve this question

Most probably, the reason you cannot handle the exception in the new AppDomain is that it is not thrown from a thread that was created in that AppDomain. From the documentation on AppDomain.UnhandledException it is not very straight-forward to see that. The interesting part is the following:

An exception is unhandled only if the entire stack for the thread has been unwound without finding an applicable exception handler, so the first place the event can be raised is in the application domain where the thread originated.

Now if the thread that executes the code that throws, is created in your main AppDomain (like the main thread of a console app), then you should add a handler in the main AppDomain. Note though that if the type of the thrown exception is not loaded in the main AppDomain, the Assembly Loader of .NET will try to load it from your applications' base directory and probing paths. If these are not the same with the child AppDomain, then the assembly will not be resolved and an(other) exception will be thrown.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right. ExecuteAssembly is called in new Thread created in default AppDomain. But it's crucial to hadle the exceptions inside the assebly loaded in new AppDomain – Wazelin Mar 27 '13 at 5:19
    
@Wazelin By handle it, you mean to simply log it. There is not much else you can do with an unhandled exception. The AppDomain is doomed and so is the application if the unhanlded exception is thrown from a thread created in the child AppDomain. If you want to isolate your application from other code, you will need to work with different processes. – Panos Rontogiannis Mar 27 '13 at 14:19

There are a variety of reasons that this might happen. The event documentation at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.appdomain.unhandledexception.aspx covers quite a bit of this complexity in detail If nothing there seems applicable, could you please post repro code?

share|improve this answer
    
IMHO This answer should be a comment – Kiquenet Mar 2 at 15:20

My guess is the handler is not invoked as the exception is handled. i.e. By the upper try{}catch{}.

share|improve this answer

I didn't realy understand why the handler doesn't get invoked.

I ended up using FirstChanceException instead of UnhandledException in Main method of loaded assembly. Like this:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException +=
    (obj, e) => Loger.WriteError(
        e.Exception.ToString(),
        e.Exception.Message,
        "default solution"
    );
share|improve this answer
    
It might suit your cause, but I doubt it. A first chance exception incident is not the same as an unchaught exception. In a nutshell, you will get this event for every exception raised, wether it ends up unhandled by code (catch blocks without a rethrow) or not. – Christian.K Mar 23 '13 at 6:45
    
Well since I use it for logging purposes only, I think it's ok. Exceptions get logged and handlers if they exist keep doing their jobs. – Wazelin Mar 23 '13 at 6:52
    
Yes, but remember that some code (even in the .net framework itself) uses exceptions internally, that neve surface and that might obscure your logging with "bogus" exceptions. Your mileage may vary, of course. – Christian.K Mar 23 '13 at 11:28
    
Thanks for the warning. I haven't thought about it. – Wazelin Mar 24 '13 at 12:53

This is a late reply, but this seems to work fine if you ask me (VS2012/.NET 4.5), exception handler needs to be registered before ExecuteAssembly is called of course: (I have a child process that causes an Access Violation by writing to a null ref (unsafe code) just to force a crash and it triggers the HandleException below:

public static void HandleException(object a_s, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs a_args)
{
    var _e = (Exception)a_args.ExceptionObject;
    Console.WriteLine(_e.GetType().ToString(), _e.Message, "default solution");
}

public void StarProcessWithinAppDomain(string fileName)
{
    try
    {
        // New appdoamin / check exception isolation level 
        AppDomain sandBox = AppDomain.CreateDomain("sandBox");
        try
        {
            AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += HandleException;
            sandBox.ExecuteAssembly(fileName);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("An error occurred (inner) within AppDomain, executing \"{0}\":" + "\n" + ex.Message, fileName);
        }
        finally
        {
            AppDomain.Unload(sandBox); 
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("An error occurred within AppDomain, executing \"{0}\":" + "\n" + ex.Message, fileName);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
  1. FirstChanceException fires.
  2. Any catch blocks are executed.
  3. If no catch block or throw in the block then UnhandledException fires

Your catch block ensures that UnhandledException doesn't fire.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.