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I've added some extension methods for strings to make working with some custom enums easier.

public static Enum ToEnum<T>(this string s)
{
    return (Enum)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s);
}

public static bool IsEnum<T>(this string s)
{
    return Enum.IsDefined(typeof(T), s);
}

Note -- because of limitations of generic type constraints, I have to write the methods like the above. I would love to use T ToEnum(this string s) where T: Enum to avoid the cast after making the call ... but no can do.

In any event, I figured it would be nice to extend this concept a little bit to return Enum? in those instances where a method signature can accept various nullable enums.

public static Enum? ToEnumSafe<T>(this string s)
{
    return (IsEnum<T>(s) ? (Enum)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s) : null);
}

However, this is a no-go due to compiler errors.

error CS0453: The type 'System.Enum' must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'System.Nullable<T>'

I have to admit I'm a bit confused here as Enum? should be a legitimate return value, no?. I tried something similar, but end up with the same error.

public static T? ToEnumSafe<T>(this string s)
{
    return (IsEnum<T>(s) ? (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s) : null);
}

I even decided to rewrite the methods to remove the generics and I get more of the same:

public static bool IsEnum(this string s, Type T)
{
    return Enum.IsDefined(T, s);
}
public static Enum? ToEnumSafe(this string s, Type T)
{
    return (IsEnum(s, T) ? (Enum)Enum.Parse(T, s) : null);
}

Am I missing something really stupid here?

share|improve this question
    
Ahh yes. I see now my dumb mistake. Enum is derived from ValueType which itself is a Reference Type as its derived from object. I think I must have been running short on brainpower at the time ;0 The confusing part is that there's nothing preventing the use of a concrete enum type -- just no can do on a more generic implementation: public enum Test { a, b }; public static class Tester { public static Test? GetTest() { return (true == true ? (Test?)Test.a : null); } } Thanks to all responders. –  Ethan J. Brown Oct 13 '09 at 15:31
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try:

public static T? ToEnumSafe<T>(this string s) where T : struct
{
    return (IsEnum<T>(s) ? (T?)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s) : null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
How would you handle this if you wanted to igore the case? i.e. pass in "monkey" with the enum lookup type being "Monkey" using your code? –  Haroon Apr 7 '11 at 12:09
    
@Haroon Enum.Parse has an overload that takes Type, string, and a boolean representing case sensitivity of an operation. –  LeakyCode Apr 7 '11 at 18:52
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You can actually do somewhat better than this - with a bit of work.

Although C# doesn't support generic constraints to say that T must be an enum type, the CLR does. I have a project called Unconstrained Melody which is a library of "useful things to do with an enum." I suspect it already copes with what you want (so long as you only need to use the names in the enum, not the string representations of the integer values). Although it doesn't have IsDefined(string), it does have TryParse which will do the same job.

See this blog post for more details.

As to why Enum? isn't a valid return type - System.Enum itself is a reference type (just like System.ValueType), so it's already nullable. You can only use ? with non-nullable value types.

share|improve this answer
    
I was googling to link to UnconstrainedMelody. Fortunately, you came around just at the right time :) –  LeakyCode Oct 12 '09 at 21:19
    
Awesome... this is a library that I hadn't come across. Will be checking it out. –  Ethan J. Brown Oct 13 '09 at 15:48
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public static Enum ToEnum<T>(this string s)
{
    return (Enum)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s);
}

should be

public static T ToEnum<T>(this string s)
{
    return (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s);
}

can also fix the following

public static Enum? ToEnumSafe<T>(this string s)
{
    return (IsEnum<T>(s) ? (Enum)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s) : null);
}

to

public static T? ToEnumSafe<T>(this string s)
    where T : struct
{
    return (IsEnum<T>(s) ? (T?)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s) : null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
return (IsEnum<T>(s) ? (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), s) : null); won't compile. –  LeakyCode Oct 12 '09 at 21:16
    
shoot missed a '?' –  Dave Oct 12 '09 at 21:21
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An Enum is no distinct Type in .Net it is just a placeholder for a concrete value type (int in case you didn't specify otherwise).

That means you cant have it as type declaration at all (regardless of static extention method or not).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes you can. System.Enum is a valid type in itself - but it's a reference type rather than a value type, hence "Enum?" doesn't work. –  Jon Skeet Oct 12 '09 at 21:24
    
Well lets say you can't have it as a type for the purpose the original author wanted it to have. Because other than the stuff it inherits from ValueType and its interfaces it has no own non-static methods or properties. –  Foxfire Oct 13 '09 at 0:47
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