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Lets say I have two implementations of search algorithm that return the same result for the same input. They both implement the same interface.

How can I use a singe [TestClass] for testing both implementations, rather then create two test files with eventually the same logic ?

Can I tell MSUnit to launch a one of the tests twice with different constructor parameter?
Perhaps I should (n)inject it somehow ?

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In your question you ask about MSTest, but in your tags you specify NUnit. Which one do you want answers for? –  Joe White Mar 22 '13 at 12:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use an abstract test class:

[TestClass]
public abstract class SearchTests
{
    private ISearcher _searcherUnderTest;

    [TestSetup]
    public void Setup()
    {
        _searcherUnderTest = CreateSearcher();
    }

    protected abstract ISearcher CreateSearcher();

    [TestMethod]
    public void Test1(){/*do stuff to _searcherUnderTest*/ }

    // more tests...

    [TestClass]
    public class CoolSearcherTests : SearcherTests
    {
         protected override ISearcher CreateSearcher()
         {
             return new CoolSearcher();
         }
    }

    [TestClass]
    public class LameSearcherTests : SearcherTests
    {
         protected override ISearcher CreateSearcher()
         {
             return new LameSearcher();
         }
    }
}
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1  
And this is the only good solution. –  Piotr Perak Apr 3 '13 at 10:20

I'd rather have two different [TestMethod] in one [TestClass] each testing only one implementation: this way a failing test will always correctly point you which implementation went wrong.

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2  
And your two [TestMethod] methods can simply be one line methods that both call the same method that actually contains the test code. –  ShellShock Mar 22 '13 at 12:02
    
There are ~10 different testmethods for the search implementation I have. You basically suggest copy-pasting those methods to be 20 methods in the same class (or 10 in two different testclasses) –  Alex Mar 22 '13 at 12:03
    
@ShellShock, well, that's basically how I implement it now, but I'm looking for some built-in or ready functionality for that. –  Alex Mar 22 '13 at 12:03

If you are using NUnit you can pass through a variable declared in an attribute http://www.nunit.org/index.php?p=testCase&r=2.5.6

if you use something like:

[TestCase(1)]
[TestCase(2)]
public void Test(int algorithm)
{
//..dostuff
}

if will run once for 1, once for 2, uses the same setup/teardown too :)

There isn't an equivalent in MSTest however you can fudge it somewhat as explained here: Does MSTest Have an Equivalent to NUnits TestCase

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You've tagged your question with NUnit, but you ask about MSTest. What you are asking about can be achieved with parameterized test fixtures in NUnit. I am not familiar enough with MSTest to suggest an equivalent approach there, and a quick search indicates that MSTest may not have this feature.

In NUnit you parameterize the test fixture by applying multiple [TestFixture(...)] attributes to the fixture class with different parameters. These parameters will be passed to the fixture constructor.

Since there are limits on the types of parameter that can be passed, you'll probably need to pass a string in specifying the algorithm, then in the constructor assign the delegate or object that provides the search algorithm to a member field which is used in the tests.

For example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace MyTests
{
    public static class SearchAlgorithms
    {
        public static int DefaultSearch(int target, IList<int> data)
        {
            return data.IndexOf(target);
        }

        public static int BrokenSearch(int target, IList<int> data)
        {
            return 789;
        }
    }

    [TestFixture("forward")]
    [TestFixture("broken")]
    public class SearchTests
    {
        private Func<int, IList<int>, int> searchMethod;

        public SearchTests(string algorithmName)
        {
            if (algorithmName == "forward")
            {
                this.searchMethod = SearchAlgorithms.DefaultSearch;
                return;
            }

            if (algorithmName == "broken")
            {
                this.searchMethod = SearchAlgorithms.BrokenSearch;
            }
        }

        [Test]
        public void SearchFindsCorrectIndex()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(
                1, this.searchMethod(2, new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 }));
        }

        [Test]
        public void SearchReturnsMinusOneWhenTargetNotPresent()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(
                -1, this.searchMethod(4, new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 }));
        }
    }
}
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