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GTK uses the GSEAL option to prevent someones access to the Widget-struct. That's great, because of objective programming in C you should use get-functions like in other languages.

Because there are no get-function for each value of GtkButton, I have some problems modifying my own GtkWidgets.

I want access to these values in struct _GtkButton

struct _GtkButton
{
    ....
    guint GSEAL (activate_timeout);
    guint GSEAL (in_button) : 1;
    guint GSEAL (button_down) : 1;
    ....
}

I want to add an on-click event for mybutton, to cancel click events before they will be called, so I decided to reimplement:

static void gtk_real_button_pressed(GtkButton *button)
{
    if (button->activate_timeout)
        return;

    button->button_down = TRUE;
    gtk_button_update_state(button);
}

static void gtk_real_button_released(GtkButton *button)
{
    if (button->button_down)
    {
        button->button_down = FALSE;

        if (button->activate_timeout)
            return;

        if (button->in_button)
        {
            // do my own stuff here  and maybe don'tcall "gtk_button_clicked(...)"
            gtk_button_clicked(button);
        }    
        gtk_button_update_state(button);
    }
}

as I say at the top I now need access to button->in_button for example. Anybody has an clue, that could help me ? :)


by the way:

guint GSEAL (button_down) : 1;

I can't figure out whats the use of : 1 in this case. :O

share|improve this question
    
just found a solution. i will post it in 6 hours, because i have les then 10 reputation :O xD –  Justus Schmidt Mar 22 '13 at 13:48
1  
the ": 1" means that only one bit of the type is going to be used, and the compiler should try to pack the structure more tightly if at all possible. –  ebassi Mar 22 '13 at 14:29
    
thx for the info, actually found this out myself by diging through the memory in the debuger :) –  Justus Schmidt Mar 22 '13 at 14:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have never been supposed to access those fields in the GtkButton instance structure: they are private, and only available for internal use (the reason why they are not truly private like in modern GTK code is because GtkButton existed long before we could add instance private data inside GObject - long story).

The GtkButton::clicked signal is marked at RUN_FIRST, which means that the default signal handler associated to the class is run before any callback attached using g_signal_connect().

If you want to prevent the GtkButton::clicked signal from being emitted (which is not a great idea to begin with, anyway) you can use a signal emission hook, or you can subclass GtkButton and stop the signal emission from within the default handler.

share|improve this answer
    
i am using gtk 2 i already subclassed Gtk Button now and looked up the gtk source code to rewrite "real_button_press" and "real_button_release" –  Justus Schmidt Mar 22 '13 at 15:06
    
in order to explan myself: i am writting a panel, that should enter a edit mode if i am holding down a button for about 5 seconds. In editing mode all my buttons shouldn't rais their click event. instead of using a boolean i want an "on-click" event and return an 'abort signal' if i need it. –  Justus Schmidt Mar 22 '13 at 15:17

You should NEVER access the member variables like this. EVER. These are private variables. That is why GSeal was introduced. Your code may break on updates to GTK+

share|improve this answer
    
i realy know this, but in order to write my own Widgets, i have to overwrite some functions from the parent. in this case the "GtkButton". i have to use gtk 2.10 because of an arm controller and cross compiler i use. So in my case, gtk will not be updated! and if so, my widgets also should be updated. i looked up the "gtkbutton.c" and only rewrite a bit, for my needs, instead of changing gtkbutton.c. –  Justus Schmidt Mar 22 '13 at 15:12
    
if you need to do this, then you're doing it wrong. Ebassi told you the correct way to go about doing what you want to do. (Gtk2.10 doesn't use GSeal anyway.) –  iain Mar 22 '13 at 15:17
    
this was my first idea, to implement my needs. didn't found an other way :/ btw: just saw i am using gtk 2.10 on arm and 2.24 on my pc. your right, 2.10 doesn't use GSEAL. i am looking forward to find another solution, like ebassi said. –  Justus Schmidt Mar 22 '13 at 15:29

I now use this little function, using the gseal values was realy nothing i should do.

typedef struct _GuiOnClickHandler   GuiOnClickHandler;
struct _GuiOnClickHandler
{
    gboolean abortClick;

};

static void gui_recipe_button_clicked(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
    GuiOnClickHandler handler;
    handler.abortClick = FALSE;

    g_signal_emit_by_name((gpointer)widget, "on-click", &handler);

    if (handler.abortClick)
        g_signal_stop_emission_by_name((gpointer)widget, "clicked");
}

...somewhere else on init, at first place

    g_signal_connect(GTK_OBJECT (button), "clicked",
            G_CALLBACK (gui_recipe_button_clicked), NULL);
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