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Can someone help me out with algorithm for solving linear equations in modular arithmetic (!). I need only the "smallest" solution. Smallest means lexicographically first.

Let's have this system:
3x1+2x2=3
4x1+3x2+1x3+2x4=4
Number next to x is index.

Matrix for this system where we use modulo 5 (0<=x<=p where p is our modulo) is
3 2 0 0 0 | 3
4 3 1 2 0 | 4

The smallest solution for this is (0,4,0,1,0). I have to write an algorithm which will give me that solution. I was thinking about brute-force, because p<1000. But I dont how to do it, because in this situation in first row I have to x1=0 ... p-1 , then solve x2, in the second row i have to pick x3= 0 ... p-1. And solve x4. I have to do this until that system of equations hold. If I go from 0 .. p-1, then the first solution I get will be the smallest one.

PS:There can a lot of forms of matrix, like:
3 2 4 0 0 | 3
4 3 1 2 1 | 4


1 2 0 0 0 | 3
3 0 3 0 0 | 3
4 3 1 2 3 | 4
etc.

Sorry for my english, I am from asia.

Edit: I was thinking about how to determine which variables are parameters. But can't figure it out....

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1  
Define "smallest". Isn't (1,0,0,0,0) a smaller solution? –  Klas Lindbäck Mar 22 '13 at 12:39
    
whether your two equations are 2x^2 + 3x = 3 and 2x^4+x^3+3x^2+4x=4 ??? And i didnt get your solution (0,4,0,1,0) –  999k Mar 22 '13 at 12:40
    
@KlasLindbäck sry, defined!:) @ 55K no, its 3x(index 1) +2x(index 2) etc. –  user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 12:42
    
Gaussian elimination should work the same as in the reals, with one critical distinction: where you would normally try and "divide" you must now compute the inverse mod p and multiply. –  GregS Mar 22 '13 at 23:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ah well, what the heck, why not, here you go

#include <stdio.h>

#define L 2
#define N 5
#define MOD 5

static int M[L][N] =
{       { 3, 2, 0, 0, 0 }
,       { 4, 3, 1, 2, 0 }
};

static int S[L] =
{       3, 4
};

static void init(int * s)
{
        int     i;
        for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
                s[i] = 0;
        }
}

static int next(int * s)
{
        int     i, c;
        c = 1;
        for (i = N-1; i >= 0 && c > 0; i--)
        if ( (++s[i]) == MOD)
        {
                s[i] = 0;
        }
        else
        {
                c = 0;
        }
        return c == 0;
}

static int is_solution(int * s)
{
        int     i, j, sum;

        for (i = 0; i < L; i++)
        {
                sum = 0;
                for (j = 0; j < N; j++)
                {
                        sum += M[i][j]*s[j];
                }
                if (sum % MOD != S[i])
                {
                        return 0;
                }
        }
        return 1;
}

int main(void)
{
        int     s[N];

        init(s);
        do
        {
                if (is_solution(s))
                {
                        int     i;
                        for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
                        {
                                printf(" %d", s[i]);
                        }
                        printf("\n");
                        break;
                }
        } while (next(s));
        return 0;
}
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it is not working e.g for static int M[L][N] = { { 4, -2, 0, 0, 2 } , { 0, 0, -1, 4, 1 } }; with mod=3, and changed S[L]={4,0} - I hope I did get what it should be –  user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 14:53
    
ok, got it working, but how can I know if the system of equations have solution or not? –  user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 19:09
    
If there are no solutions, the program will print no solution. Note that if you leave out the last break it will print all solutions. –  Bryan Olivier Mar 22 '13 at 20:06
    
And what is time complexity of this? I'll have 0<mod<1000 (only prime numbers) at most 10 equations with at most 10 variables –  user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 20:41
    
Because if I run it with a system of equations without solution, it won't stop –  user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 20:55

You can treat this as a problem in linear algebra and Gaussian elimination mod p.

You are trying to find solutions of Mx = y mod p. Start with a square M by adding rows of 0'x = 0 if necessary. Now use Gaussian elimination mod p to reduce M, as far as possible, to upper triangular form. You end up with a system of equations such as

ax + by + cz = H

 dy + ez = G

but with some zeros on the diagonal, either because you have run out of equations, or because all of the equations have zero at a particular column. If you have something that says 0z = 1 or similar there is no solution. If not you can work out one of possibly many solutions by solving from the bottom up as usual, and putting in z=0 if there is no equation left that has a non-zero coefficient for z on the diagonal.

I think that this will produce the lexicographically smallest answer if the most significant unknown corresponds to the bottom of the vector. The following shows how you can take an arbitrary solution and make it lexicographically smallest, and I think that you will find that it would not modify solutions produced as above.

Now look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kernel_%28matrix%29. There is a linear space of vectors n such that Mn = 0, and all the solutions of the equation are of the form x + n, where n is a vector in this space - the null space - and x is a particular solution, such as the one you have worked out.

You can work out a basis for the null space by finding solutions of Mn = 0 much as you found x. Find a column where there is no non-zero entry on the diagonal, go to the row where the diagonal for that column should be, set the unknown for that column to 1, and move up the matrix from there, choosing the other unknowns so that you have a solution of Mn = 0.

Notice that all of the vectors you get from this have 1 at some position in that vector, 0s below that vector, and possibly non-zero entries above. This means that if you add multiples of them to a solution, starting with the vector which has 1 furthest down, later vectors will never disturb components of the solution where you have previously added in vectors with 1 low down, because later vectors always have zero there.

So if you want to find the lexicographically smallest solution you can arrange things so that you use the basis for the null space with the lexicographically largest entries first. Start with an arbitrary solution and add in null space vectors as best you can, in lexicographical order, to reduce the solution vector. You should end up with the lexicographically smallest solution vector - any solution can be produced from any other solution by adding in a combination of basis vectors from the null space, and you can see from the above procedure that it produces the lexicographically smallest such result - at each stage the most significant components have been made as small as possible and any alternatives must be lexicographically greater.

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